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McClatchy Tribune News Service

LOS ANGELES — Los Angeles police detectives are investigating allegations from a woman who claims Justin Bieber took her cellphone at a miniature golf course.

“He has been accused of attempted robbery,” Officer Rosario Herrera told the Los Angeles Times, adding detectives have not talked to the pop star yet.

The woman said Bieber allegedly grabbed the phone because he thought she was taking pictures of him at the San Fernando Valley course, the police official said. Bieber was not accused of keeping the phone.

The woman told officers the incident took place Monday around 10:30 p.m. in the Los Angeles Police Department’s Devonshire Division.

Bieber has had a series of run-ins with law enforcement authorities this year.

In February, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department detectives investigated Bieber in a felony vandalism case after he allegedly egged a neighbor’s home in Calabasas, Calif.

The egging in the 25000 block of Prado Del Grandioso was considered a possible felony because damage totaled $20,000, authorities said.

Through his attorney, Bieber denied any wrongdoing in the alleged egging.

Bieber was arrested in Florida on Jan. 23 and later charged with misdemeanor driving under the influence, resisting arrest and driving without a license.

Earlier this year, Bieber surrendered to Toronto police on an assault allegation involving a limousine driver.

AFP Photo/Joe Raedle

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