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President-elect Joe Biden

Photo by LBJLibraryNow

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Three days after the Associated Press, CNN, and other major media outlets reported that Joe Biden had an insurmountable lead in the Pennsylvania vote count and been elected president of the United States, President Donald Trump still refused to concede. He insisted that he was the real winner, and he claimed, without merit, that the election had been stolen from him through rampant voter fraud — even as his lawsuits based on these claims were repeatedly thrown out by courts.

On Tuesday at a press conference in Wilmington, Delaware, President-elect Biden was asked about Trump's refusal to concede, and he spoke his mind.


Biden told a reporter, "I just think it's an embarrassment, quite frankly…. I think it will not help the president's legacy."


The president-elect added, "I know, from my discussions with foreign leaders thus far, that they are hopeful that the United States' democratic institutions are viewed once again as being strong and enduring. But I think at the end of the day, it's all going to come to fruition on January 20. And between now and then, I hope that…. the American people do understand that there has been a transition. Even among Republicans who are people who voted for the president, I understand the sense of loss. I get that. But I think the majority of the people who voted for the president — a lot voted for him, a significantly smaller number, but a lot voted for him — I think they understand that we have to come together. I think they're ready to unite."

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

The late Sen. John McCain

I don't know Kyrsten Sinema, but I did know John McCain. Not at all intimately, to be sure, but just enough to say -- despite her pretensions and the fantasies of her flacks that she is the reincarnation of the war hero in a purple wig -- that Kyrsten Sinema is no John McCain.

Lately Sinema has advertised herself as a "maverick," by which she means that she flouts the positions and policies of her party's leadership, and is supposed to pair her with McCain, who sometimes strayed from the Republican party line. Her most notorious attempt at imitation occurred last year with a gesture on the Senate floor marking her vote against a minimum wage increase. Her coy mimicry of the admired war hero was synthetic, leaving an unpleasant odor in its wake. When McCain delivered his bold "thumbs down" on gutting Obamacare, he was protecting Arizona's working families – not betraying them.

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