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The same Newt Gingrich who built his career by stoking resentment toward racial minorities and the poor and who insisted that Occupy Wall Street protesters objecting to massive income inequality and unemployment should “take a bath” and “get a job,” is now mourning the outsized influence of the wealthy on American politics.

Seriously.

Bitter and frustrated about his massive slide in the polls, which followed Mitt Romney’s Super PAC spending millions on attack ads against him, Gingrich responded to a question about the Citizens United Supreme Court ruling that makes such campaign spending possible by taking a position that’s more Russ Feingold than Mitch McConnell.

“I think the current mess is a disgrace,” he said of the floodgates opened for outside spending by the decision. “I think it debilitates politics. I think it strengthens millionaires, and it weakens middle-class candidates.”

Most middle class people don’t spend millions in shopping sprees at Tiffany’s. But who’s keeping score?

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For a long time, inflation has been the phantom of the American economy: often expected but never seen. But the latest Consumer Price Index, which showed that prices rose by five percent from May of last year to May of this year, raises fears that it is breaking down the front door and taking over the guest room.

The price jump was the biggest one-month increase since 2008. It appears to support the warning of former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers, who wrote in February that President Joe Biden's budget binge could "set off inflationary pressures of a kind we have not seen in a generation." Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell charged last month that the administration has already produced "raging inflation."

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