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Senate Republicans’ campaign arm looks like it needs to watch its language when discussing a top Democratic candidate.

Tuesday afternoon, the National Republican Senatorial Committee tweeted — and, soon after, deleted — the accusation: “Tammy Duckworth has a sad record of not standing up for our veterans.” Duckworth, a congresswoman from Illinois, is challenging incumbent GOP Sen. Mark Kirk.

The problem: Tammy Duckworth is not only a veteran herself, but accusing her of “not standing up for our veterans” is a particularly poor choice of words. Duckworth lost both her legs in Iraq, when the helicopter she was co-piloting was hit by an insurgent’s rocket-propelled grenade. As she has written of the experience: “My right leg was vaporized; my left leg was crushed and shredded against the instrument panel.” Her right arm was also severely injured, though doctors were indeed able to save it.

Jonathan Chait preserved it in this screen grab:

One possible reply to Chait: Hey, this staffer might actually have a bright future working on Donald Trump’s media team.

Photo: Rep. Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) at the Hyde Park Independence Day Parade, July 4, 2015, via Facebook.

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Sen. Jeanne Shaheen

Sixteen states vying for the early slots in 2024’s presidential primary calendar pitched their case to the Democratic National Committee onWednesday and Thursday, touting their history, diversity, economies, and electoral competitiveness in the general election.

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Supreme Court

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When Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell was confronted over his support for the bipartisan bill addressing elements of gun violence, he defended his Second Amendment record, telling reporters: “I spent my career supporting, defending and expanding” gun rights, and stressing that he had “spent years” confirming conservative judges. McConnell made that statement in full confidence that the Supreme Court he packed with three illegitimate justices would do precisely what it did: ensure that sensible gun regulations anywhere would be eliminated.

The court decided the New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. Bruen case Thursday in 6-3 decision written by Justice Clarence Thomas, striking down that state’s 108-year-old provision requiring anyone who wants to get a license to carry a concealed handgun outside the home to show “proper cause” before being granted a permit. The Court’s extremists, Thomas writes, find that New York's strict limits on the concealed carry of firearms in public violates the Second Amendment. It essentially throws out the previous restrictions the Court upheld in its last big gun control case, the 2008 District of Columbia v. Heller.

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