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Tag: arizona

Arizona GOP Candidate Kari Lake Campaigns On QAnon Show

Days before the state’s August 2 primary, Arizona Republican gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake appeared on a QAnon show where she asked viewers to donate to her campaign and vote for her. The hosts also endorsed her; invoked the QAnon conspiracy theory’s central figure and mentioned other QAnon figures; and seemingly bragged that her interview showed the influence of the “anons.”

On July 29, Lake, a frontrunner in the primary, appeared on the MatrixxxGrooove Show (or MG Show), which is co-hosted by QAnon influencer Jeffrey Pedersen. (Pedersen is known online as “intheMatrixxx” and Lake has previously been photographed with him.) During the interview, Pedersen asked viewers to donate “$17, $20, $50, you know, to help her get to the final stretch, maybe get some TV ads out there”; 17 is a reference to “Q,” the conspiracy theory’s central figure, being the 17th letter of the alphabet. He also urged Lake to use one of his followers who has “such a beautiful voice” for her campaign events.

Lake also asked viewers to “vote early, if you can, vote on election day,” to donate to her campaign, and to “let your friends and relatives in Arizona know how much is on the line right now.” Pedersen also mentioned other QAnon influencers and a QAnon influencer collective that he is a part of, and he urged viewers to vote for Lake. Lake also said it was “a real pleasure” to meet the show’s co-hosts, and Pedersen said that “MG Show endorses Kari Lake for Arizona governor.”


After the interview, Pedersen praised Lake for coming on, saying, “I’m proud that she came on the show. That really shows me a lot.” He also seemingly suggested it showed the influence of “the anons out in this community.”

Multiple other Arizona political figures have now appeared on MatrixxxGrooove Show, including Dan Schultz, who played a major role in an increase in QAnon supporters becoming Republican precinct committee members.

(To see the full Kari Lake interview on the MG Show, click here.)

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters.

Murdoch To Kushner On Election Night 2020: Arizona 'Isn't Even Close'

Although Fox News is facing a major defamation lawsuit from Dominion Voting Systems for promoting the false and totally debunked claim that Dominion’s equipment was used to help steal the 2020 presidential election from Donald Trump, some members of Fox News’ hard news division did some accurate reporting on Election Night. The Fox News decision desk, in fact, accurately called Arizona for now-President Joe Biden on Election Night 2020, and according to former White House Senior Adviser Jared Kushner’s new book, Breaking History: A White House Memoir, Rupert Murdoch had no doubt that Biden was the legitimate winner in Arizona.

After Fox News called Arizona for Biden, Murdoch, according to the book, told Kushner: “The numbers are ironclad. It’s not even close.” Subsequent vote recounts in Arizona demonstrated that Murdoch, in that case, was absolutely right: Biden, not Trump, was the clear winner in Arizona.

Biden’s victory in Arizona, like his victory in Georgia, was among the bombshells of 2020’s presidential election. For many years, Arizona was a deep red state and was synonymous with the conservative politics of Sen. Barry Goldwater and his successor, Sen. John McCain. But in recent years, Arizona has evolved into a swing state. Both of Arizona’s two U.S. senators, Kyrsten Sinema and Mark Kelly, are centrist Democrats, although its term-limited governor, Doug Ducey, is a right-wing Republican.


Breaking History has an August 23 release date on Amazon, and previews of Kushner’s book have come from the New York Times’ Maggie Haberman and The Guardian’s Martin Pengelly. In an article published by the Times on July 25, Haberman reported that according to the book, Kushner was secretly treated for thyroid cancer in 2019.

Pengelly’s reporting, in an article published by The Guardian on July 28, focuses heavily on what Kushner’s book has to say about Arizona. In Breaking History, Kushner says of Biden’s Arizona victory, “The shocking projection brought our momentum to a screeching halt. It instantly changed the mood among our campaign’s leaders, who were scrambling to understand the network’s methodology…. I dialed Rupert Murdoch and asked why Fox News had made the Arizona call before hundreds of thousands of votes were tallied. Rupert said he would look into the issue, and minutes later, he called back.”

During that conversation, Murdoch told Kushner, “Sorry Jared, there is nothing I can do. The Fox News data authority says the numbers are ironclad. He says it won’t be close.’”

Trump was furious when Fox News called Arizona for Biden, and he continues to make the false claim that Arizona was stolen from him through voter fraud — a false claim that former television news anchor and far-right conspiracy theorist Kari Lake, the frontrunner in Arizona’s 2022 GOP gubernatorial primary, has been campaigning on.

Reprinted with permission from Alternet.

Pence, GOP Leaders Oppose Trump's Choice For Arizona Governor

A growing chorus of Republican current and former elected officials are coming out in the final days of the Arizona gubernatorial primary to try to stop Kari Lake from winning the Republican nomination, worried that her torrent of lies about the 2020 presidential election will make her unpalatable to the general electorate in November.

Former Vice President Mike Pence on Monday became the latest GOP official to endorse Lake's top opponent, Karrin Taylor Robson, saying in a statement released by Taylor Robson's campaign: "As Arizona Democrats pursue the reckless Biden-Harris agenda, Karrin Taylor Robson is the only candidate for governor that will keep Arizona's border secure and streets safe, empower parents and create great schools, and promote conservative values. Karrin is the best choice for Arizona's future, and I am proud to support her."

Lake, Taylor Robson, and a number of other Republican candidates are running for the chance to face likely Democratic nominee and current Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs in the fall. Former GOP Arizona U.S. Rep. Matt Salmon dropped out of the governor's race after it became clear he was not going to win and threw his support behind Robson on June 29.

Pence joins current Arizona Republican Gov. Doug Ducey in bucking former President Donald Trump, who endorsed Lake in September 2021, citing her commitment to "election integrity."

Lake has made lies about the 2020 election the central focus of her campaign.

"Donald Trump is endorsing us because he knows we refuse to turn a blind eye to this election of 2020. We are not going to sweep this one under the rug," Lake said in November 2021 after Trump endorsed her. "I would love to see people in handcuffs. And I want a long perp walk that we can watch them all walk. We need to lock these people up."

Lake falsely claims Trump won Arizona's Electoral College votes, even though President Joe Biden carried the state. And she says that she not only would have refused to certify Biden's victory, despite the fact that he won by roughly 11,000 votes in the state, but she would also decertify Biden's victory after the fact.

During a primary debate on June 19, Lake asked her fellow candidates to raise their hands if they agreed with her that "we had a corrupt stolen election." Scott Neely and Paola Tulliani Zen immediately did so; Taylor Robson did not. Robson responded to Lake by saying, "I believe our election was absolutely not fair." She blamed "liberal judges," "liberal media, "Big Tech," and Mark Zuckerberg for creating the conditions for "78 percent of Arizona Republicans thinking something was wrong with the election. But I am focused on 2022 because the left is 10 steps ahead of us and I don't have the time to explain what they're doing."

After the debate, Lake tweeted, "'Would you agree that we had a corrupt, stolen election? Raise your hand' Only one #AZGOV Candidate REFUSED to raise her hand: Karrin Taylor Robson. Disqualifying."

Ducey, who certified Biden's win over the objections of the Trump campaign, said Lake's election lies are a liability.

"Kari Lake is misleading voters with no evidence. She's been tagged by her opponents with a nickname, Fake Lake, which seems to be sticking and actually doing some damage," Ducey said Sunday on CNN's "State of the Union."

"It really is so sad to see @GOP Governor @DougDucey join the Propagandists at @CNN to blast Trump AND the Trump-Endorsed Republican candidate," Lake tweeted after Ducey's appearance on CNN. "I just can't figure out why he doesn't support our America First Movement."

A poll of likely Republican voters in Arizona conducted by OH Predictive Insights between June 30 and July 2, 2022 found Lake leading Robson 40%-35%, with 21% remaining undecided ahead of the Aug. 2 primary.

Early voting began in Arizona on July 6.

That day, Trump reiterated his support for Lake, saying in a statement, "With Kari, you'll have Election Integrity, Strong Borders, Safe Streets, and all of the other things you've wanted for so long. Vote for Kari Lake. She has my Complete and Total Endorsement!"

On Friday, Trump and Pence will hold competing rallies for their respective picks for governor.

While it's so far unclear how much the endorsement battle will impact the primary vote, Pence's stock among Republicans has fallen considerably, with just 6% of GOP voters responding to a New York Times/Siena College poll conducted July 5-7 that they would vote for Pence if he ran for president in 2024.

Trump meanwhile remains widely popular among Arizona Republicans, with 81% having a favorable opinion of the former president, according to the OH Predictive Insights poll.

Inside Elections, the nonpartisan political handicapping outlet, rates the Arizona gubernatorial general election a toss-up.

FiveThirtyEight's aggregate of polls currently shows Hobbs with a lead against both Robson and Lake. The lead is larger over Lake.

Reprinted with permission from American Independent.

Ginni Thomas Pressured Arizona Lawmakers To Overturn 2020 Election

Far right wing activist, lobbyist, and spouse of a U.S. Supreme Court justice, Ginni Thomas pressed lawmakers in Arizona to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election. In emails she urged them to “stand strong in the face of political and media pressure,” and send a “clean slate” of electors, falsely claiming the choice is “yours and yours alone.”

“The emails, sent by Ginni Thomas to a pair of lawmakers on Nov. 9, 2020, argued that legislators needed to intervene because the vote had been marred by fraud. Though she did not mention either candidate by name, the context was clear,” reports The Washington Post, which broke the news Friday. “In sending the emails, Thomas played a role in the extraordinary scheme to keep Trump in office by substituting the will of legislatures for the will of voters.”

“Before you choose your state’s Electors … consider what will happen to the nation we all love if you don’t stand up and lead,” an email bearing Ginni Thomas’ name, sent to the Arizona lawmakers, reads:

It included a link to a video of a man delivering a message meant for swing-state lawmakers, urging them to 'put things right' and 'not give in to cowardice.'

'You have only hours to act,' said the speaker, who is not identified in the video.

Thomas also pressed Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows to work to overturn the election, as has been widely reported.Her efforts, combined with Justice Thomas’ actions on the Supreme Court, amount to “breathtaking corruption,” writes Slate’s legal expert Mark Joseph Stern.“The conflict of interest between Ginni and Clarence Thomas has never been greater. While Clarence was applying the ‘independent state legislature doctrine’ from the bench, Ginni was using the exact same theory to try to overturn the 2020 election. Just breathtaking corruption,” Stern says.


He adds:


Former federal prosecutor Joyce Vance, now an NBC News/MSNBC legal analyst and law professor, issued a strong warning:

“Either Justice Thomas recuses in every case that comes to the Court where his wife is heavily involved in the action or the public’s confidence in the Court will be damaged beyond repair.”


Reuters reporter covering the U.S. Supreme Court, Lawrence Hurley:

Former federal corruption prosecutor Noah Bookbinder, who is president of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) says it is “outrageous” Justice Thomas has refused to recuse:

“New evidence that Ginni Thomas’s participation in efforts to overturn the 2020 election was even greater than we knew; in this case pressure on AZ legislators to overturn that state’s vote. Makes it even more outrageous that Justice Thomas did not recuse.”

“Wow!” exclaimed Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and former New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof. “Ginni Thomas, wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, pressed Arizona legislators to overturn Biden’s win and choose a ‘clean slate of electors.’ In other words, she supported a coup to overthrow an elected president. What did her husband know?”

Economist and frequent political commentator David Rothschild observes, “Ginni Thomas was conspiring with high ranking Republicans to overturn [the] republic, and her husband was either privy to or actively involved in this conspiracy before using his position to coverup his wife’s role.”

Former SDNY Asst. U.S. Attorney Richard Signorelli sums up:

Reprinted with permission from Alternet.

Why Republican Talk Of 'Invasion' From Mexico Is A Dangerous Lie

Republicans eager to concoct reasons to attack the Biden administration have spent the past month beating their well-worn drum about a nonexistent “invasion” at the U.S.-Mexico border by Latino immigrants. But this time around, the effect has been jarring.

That’s because, since late February, the world has been seeing in real time what an actual invasion looks like, thanks to the attack on Ukraine by Vladimir Putin and the Russian Army. We’ve witnessed cities bombed into rubble, tanks rumbling through the countryside, suburbs turned into death camps, women and children murdered while waiting at railway stations.

When ordinary people think of invasions, they usually are referring to what we are seeing in Ukraine: One nation’s government sending its armed forces across borders and attempting to defeat the other nation's military and ultimately depose its government. You know, what we did in Iraq. Planes, tanks, bombs, the works. Shock and awe.

They don't think of poor people trekking across the desert, looking to land hard labor in our farm fields and on construction sites, or at least escape persecution and seek political asylum, quite the same way. Unless, of course, they are Republicans.

As James Downie in The Washington Post observed:

Notice that McCaul didn’t limit this comparison to traffickers or criminals trying to cross the border. No, every single person trying to cross—including the tens of thousands seeking asylum and the hundreds of thousands of families and unaccompanied children who are just seeking a better life—is in McCaul’s framing no different from soldiers invading a sovereign nation.

The invasion rhetoric has become thick on the ground as Republicans prepare for the 2020 midterm elections in their usual fashion: ginning up as much fear about nonwhite immigration as humanly possible.

Donald Trump, as usual, has been leading the way. “We are being invaded by millions and millions of people, many of them criminals,” he told the crowd at a rally in Washington Township, Michigan, on April 2, claiming that between 10 and 12 million undocumented people were waiting to cross the border. “We will be inundated by illegal immigration."

Congresswoman Elise Stefanik of New York, the House’s third-ranking Republican, also called it an invasion. “Ending Title 42 will worsen the already catastrophic invasion at our Southern Border,” she tweeted. “Joe Biden and his Far Left policies are destroying our country.”

Steven Miller, Trump’s white nationalist-friendly former senior adviser and the architect of Title 42, was even more dire: “This will mean armageddon on the border. This is how nations end.”

Arizona Congressman Paul Gosar, who has become Republicans’ go-to white nationalist in the House, joined in the hysteria on Twitter: “This is full scale invasion. This is 540,000 in one month. Putin sent 150,000 troops into Ukraine and we are ready to set fire to the world. Eliminating Title 42 will only add fuel to the fire. Madness.”

Texas lawmakers have been especially frantic in pushing the “invasion” rhetoric. Some of them are even encouraging Gov. Greg Abbott to declare an “invasion” under the U.S. Constitution, and then use state personnel to deport immigrants.

Under the plan, Texas would invoke Article IV, Section 4, and Article I, Section 10, of the Constitution to exercise wartime powers and use state Department of Public Safety officers and state National Guard troops to immediately turn back migrants at the border. The plan is being pushed by a group of former Trump administration officials and the National Border Patrol Council (NBPC), the union that represents agents and support staff of the U.S. Border Patrol. Brandon Judd, the head of NBPC, recently said Abbott should “absolutely” declare an invasion.

Judd also echoed white nationalist “replacement theory” rhetoric: “I believe that they’re trying to change the demographics of the electorate; that’s what I believe they’re doing,” he said.

The “invasion” declaration idea is being heavily promoted by the Center for Renewing America, a conservative think tank led by Ken Cuccinelli, a former Homeland Security official under Trump. Abbott has not committed to the plan, however. Most legal observers note that the term invasion is reserved to mean an “armed hostility from another political entity.”

The most pernicious aspect of the invasion rhetoric, however, is that it is fundamentally eliminationist in nature: It dehumanizes the people it targets. In this case, it serves two specific functions: It justifies state coercion and violence, and it creates permission for nonstate violence.

It’s rhetoric that has been consistently cited as inspiration and motivation by domestic terrorists of recent vintage, ranging from Norwegian terrorist Anders Breivik in 2011 to the man who shot up the Walmart in El Paso, Texas, in 2019, killing 26 people. That man’s manifesto described the attack as a response to the "Hispanic invasion of Texas,” and expressed fears that changing demographics would "make us a Democrat stronghold.”

Similarly, the man who walked into a Pittsburgh synagogue in 2018 believing Jews (and specifically the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society) were responsible for the immigrant caravan then arriving at the Mexico border, around which Trump and Fox News had indulged in nonstop fearmongering, used the same rhetoric. He posted on Gab just before he murdered 11 people and wounded six:

HIAS likes to bring invaders that kill our people.

I can’t sit by and watch my people get slaughtered.

Screw your optics, I’m going in.

It’s fascinating how the same cast of characters promoting “invasion” rhetoric has played a role in helping spread the very same far-right violence that such eliminationist speech is intended to fuel. It’s worth remembering that when Cuccinelli was the deputy director of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) under Trump, he and Acting Director Chad Wolf blocked the release of a threat assessment of future dangers to the nation that highlighted white supremacist violence and Russian election interference, saying it was blocked because of the way it might “reflect upon President Trump.”

“Mr. Cuccinelli stated that Mr. Murphy needed to specifically modify the section on white supremacy in a manner that made the threat appear less severe, as well as include information on the prominence of violent ‘left-wing’ groups,” a whistleblower later averred. Cuccinelli was also heavily involved in DHS’ project in the summer of 2020 to use an army of federal contractors to collect information on Portland’s antifascist activists, which a subsequent review found had engaged in a long litany of constitutional violations.

Invasion rhetoric has a long and violent history in American politics, dating back to the origins of nativism in the 1830s, when anti-Irish agitators like Samuel Morse (inventor of the telegraph) called the arrival of immigrants a “Papist invasion” and an attack on “the American way of life.” Likewise, a panic about a “Chinese invasion” arriving on the West Coast “900,000 strong” in the 1860s led to the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1872.

Japanese immigrants began arriving in the 1890s, and with them, fresh resentment:

During the early 1900s, paranoia about an “invasion” from Asia (mostly Japanese immigrants) gave birth to another wave of nativism. In San Francisco, local agitators founded the Asiatic Exclusion League, dedicated to repelling all elements of Japanese society from the city's midst. Its statement of principles noted that "no large community of foreigners, so cocky, with such racial, social and religious prejudices, can abide long in this country without serious friction." And the racial animus was plain: "As long as California is white man's country, it will remain one of the grandest and best states in the union, but the moment the Golden State is subjected to an unlimited Asiatic coolie invasion there will be no more California," declared a League newsletter. As one speaker at a League meeting put it: "An eternal law of nature has decreed that the white cannot assimilate the blood of another without corrupting the very springs of civilization."

It became popular among right-wing border extremists in the 1990s, particularly white nationalist ideologues like Glenn Spencer, who concocted the “Reconquista” conspiracy theory claiming that Latino ideologues were secretly conspiring to return the American Southwest to Mexican rule, creating a new Hispanic nation called “Aztlan.”

This conspiracy theory was revived by Patrick Buchanan in his 2001 book The Death of the West, which played a foundational role in spreading the white nationalist conspiracy theory of “cultural Marxism” into the mainstream. Similarly, his 2006 book State of Emergency: The Third World Invasion and Conquest of America had as its core thesis a revival of the “Reconquista” theory, claiming that Mexico was "slowly but steadily taking back the American Southwest."

“You’ve got a wholesale invasion, the greatest invasion in human history, coming across your southern border, changing the composition and character of your country,” Buchanan said on Fox News’ Hannity & Colmes in November 2007.

In the context of the Ukraine war—where Americans can see on a daily basis what an actual invasion looks like—some conservatives at least recognize how wildly out of proportion that kind of rhetoric seems now. And in light of the very real and very lethal consequences for Texans this kind of rhetoric has had in the recent past, its pervasiveness is a real cause for concern. It’s not just “hot talk.”

David J. Bier of the libertarian Cato Institute called invoking an invasion an “overheated political analogy … An ‘invasion’ isn’t just an overstatement,” Bier wrote. “It’s a completely unserious attempt to demand extraordinary, military-style measures to stop completely mundane actions like walking around a closed port of entry to file asylum paperwork or violating international labor market regulations in order to fill one of the 10 million job openings in this country.”

As the Post’s Downie observes:

Abbott, McCaul and McCarthy, whether they admit it or not, recognize that the easiest way to protect their standing in the Republican Party is to embrace the hate and stoke the same bigoted fury that led a man to open fire in a store. Perhaps one day, the GOP’s fever will break. Until it does, this country’s future remains very dark.

Printed with permission from DailyKos.

QAnon Founder Will Appear On Arizona GOP Primary Ballot

QAnon leader Ron Watkins gathered enough signatures to make it onto Arizona's Republican congressional primary ballot, the Phoenix New Times reported. Watkins shared the news to his nearly 400,000 followers on Telegram, an encrypted messaging app. He first announced his intention to run last October.

"Our fight is just beginning," he wrote.

Watkins also recorded a video that was posted to Twitter.

"Hello, I just got a confirmation from Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs [D] that I am the first congressional candidate certified for the 2022 ballot in Arizona's Congressional District Number 2," the conspiracy theorist told his followers.

The Grand Canyon State's secretary of state's office requires prospective candidates to collect 1,400 names to qualify. Watkins surpassed that total with 1,741. He faces an upward climb toward power, though, as there is a cluster of hopefuls looking to oust the current officeholder.

"Watkins is hoping to unseat Democratic incumbent Tom O'Halleran in Arizona's newly redrawn 2nd Congressional District. It's the largest district in Arizona, spanning the rural northeast stretches of the state," noted the Phoenix New Times. "But Watkins will have to beat out a slate of Republican challengers who are vying for O'Halleran's seat."

Meanwhile, on his Telegram channel, Watkins shared an alarming story from one of his fans.

"I asked an elderly lady this afternoon if she was a Republican, and she replied, 'If I ever found out my kids voted Democrat, I would shoot them dead,'" Watkins recalled to the Times in a phone call.

He said that he knocked on "thousands of doors" and that he "met many, many people, and they're all excited about my campaign."

The Times noted, however, that Watkins has not raised large amounts of money, which is generally required for mounting a successful bid in a national election.

"Watkins has raised $31,000 from donations. He reported only one donation from Arizona, the filings show. And $3,000 of that sum was a contribution from his father," the paper revealed. "Still, Watkins is unconcerned about money, he said. 'My message vibes with all the people,' he explained, saying that the number of petition signatures showed he had 'grassroots support.'"

Arizona's primary will take place on Tuesday, August 2nd.

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Arizona Republican Official Urges Holocaust Denier To ‘Run For Office’

Arizona state Sen. Wendy Rogers, who spoke at last week’s white nationalist America First Political Action Conference, called on white nationalist and Holocaust denier Vincent James Foxx to “run for office.” Rogers also recently forwarded a piece from VDare, a white nationalist website that is dedicated to warning readers about the supposed dangers of nonwhites.

Foxx is a white nationalist streamer and writer. He is also a Holocaust denier who has said that “the Holocaust is weaponized” against white people; attacked Jewish people because they supposedly “not only control Hollywood, congress, and the media, but they control social media as well”; and claimed that the impeachment of former President Donald Trump was “The Jew Coup.”

He recently spoke at AFPAC, where he pushed the white nationalist “great replacement” theory and said that “Western white culture is the majority culture, to which even non-whites assimilate into today in many western countries, and they’re better off for it.” The Twitter account AZ Right Wing Watch noted Rogers' exhortation, which was made on Telegram.

Foxx is based in Idaho and said that he has “deep connections” to the Idaho Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin (R), who spoke at AFPAC. McGeachin is now a candidate for governor.

Rogers has become a major Republican validator for the white nationalist movement, promoting its efforts while receiving rhetorical and financial support from top Republicans including Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and Trump himself. (Rogers has been incessantly lying that the 2020 election was stolen from Trump.)

On February 2, Rogers used her Telegram account to forward a post from VDare.com, which claimed that President Joe Biden’s administration has been “shipping the illegals in (illegally and impeachably).” VDare also embedded a video from openly bigoted commentator Laura Loomer supposedly showing how “illegal immigrants invade Central Florida.”

The Southern Poverty Law Center has labeled VDare a white nationalist hate group and wrote that it “regularly publishes articles by prominent white nationalists, race 'scientists,' and anti-Semites.”

VDare features posts with such headlines as: “One Problem With These Hispanic Immigrants Is Their Disgusting Behavior”; “Come Back, Stonewall Jackson! Hispanic Gangs Invade Shenandoah Valley”; “Indians Aren't That Intelligent (On Average)”; “America Does Not Need ANY Immigrants From Africa”; “Roll Over, JIHAD -- There’s Also HIJRA, Muslim Conquest By Immigration”; “National Data: Haitian Immigrants Pretty Useless -- But Haiti Still Needs Them More Than We Do”; and “OK, Let’s Give Them Reparations—If They Go Back To Africa.”

Rogers' promotions of VDare and Foxx are further examples of her love of the white nationalist movement. Last weekend, she spoke remotely at the America First Political Action Conference, a white nationalist gathering that was organized by Holocaust denier and white nationalist Nick Fuentes. During her speech, Rogers said: “I truly respect Nick because he’s the most persecuted man in America.” Rogers has frequently praised Fuentes and said that she loves him.

Rogers has repeatedly praised Fuentes’ racist followers, known as “groypers,” including saying that “I love the Groypers because the Right Wing Watch hates them” and asking the “Groyper army” to help her. The Arizona Mirror’s Jerod MacDonald-Evoy recently explained: “The self-styled online ‘army’ that Rogers was imploring to rally to her aid is a collection of white nationalists who often use online trolling tactics against people they don’t like. Their goals broadly include normalizing their extreme and racist views by aligning them with Christianity and so-called ‘traditional’ values.”

She also has repeatedly appeared on TruNews, an anti-Semitic outlet that warns viewers of “seditious Jews.” Additionally, Rogers has expressed support for the violence-linked QAnon conspiracy theory and is a proud member of the Oath Keepers, a militia group with a history of violence.

The Arizona Republican has pushed toxic rhetoric, including calling for “more gallows”; praising the Confederacy; and claiming that Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky “is a globalist puppet for Soros and the Clintons.”

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

James Carville Vows To Raise Funds For Sinema Primary Challenger

Veteran Democratic strategist James Carville, sounding a lot like Real Time host Bill Maher, has been cautioning Democrats against being too “woke” or moving too far to the left in the 2022 midterms. But the 77-year-old Carville, in a surprising move, is now saying that he will fundraise for a Democratic primary challenger to Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona in 2024 — specifically, Rep. Ruben Gallego.

In the U.S. Senate, two centrist Democrats who have been frequent obstacles to President Joe Biden’s economic agenda have been Sinema and Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia. Carville, during an interview with Vox published on January 27, was more critical of Sinema than of Manchin.

Carville told Vox, “Understand that Joe Manchin is a Roman Catholic Democrat in a state in which not a single county has voted Democrat (for president) since 2008. I repeat: not a single county has voted Democrat since 2008…. If Manchin runs for reelection, I’ll do everything I can to help him…. Now, the situation with Sinema in Arizona is an entirely different situation.”

Reprinted with permission from Alternet