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Tag: candace owens

This Week In Crazy


Now Republicans have said a lot of crazy shit in 2021 and TikTok does not give me enough time. So we're just going to do This Week In Crazy.

So many crazier right-wing women have come after her, but it's not difficult to remember that pioneer of crazy Sarah Palin. Yes, she's still around and yes, she's still making verbal diarrhea.

Caribou Barbie recently said that she would get the vaccine "over her dead body." Hmmm....I wonder if that's a promise. The only thing good to ever come out of Sarah Palin, of course, was Tina Fey playing her.

Right-wing, anti-vaxxer conspiracy-theorist, and pretty much attention-wh*re Candace Owens recently hawked a crazy "Covid cure" that apparently turns people's skin blue. She's hawking colloidal silver, which the Mayo Clinic says has "no use at all." You know, kinda like Candace Owens.

Lady from Avatar or Candace Owens follower?

And that was This Week In Crazy. Follow Us On TikTok for more.

Michael Hayne is a comedian, writer, voice artist, podcaster, and impressionist. Follow his work on Facebook and TikTok


Anti-Vaxxer Candace Owens Pushing Potentially Fatal Covid 'Cure'

Reprinted with permission from Daily Kos

The notoriously ignorant right-winger and anti-vaxxer Candance Owens went from denying the validity of vaccines to encouraging her 4.1 million followers on Instagram to follow her regimen of using colloidal silver as a daily supplement.

“Yes, colloidal silver!” Owens says enthusiastically in her latest Instagram video. “I take colloidal silver every single day, I love colloidal silver. That is a great one. That is another one that people probably know nothing about.”

And just in case you’re interested in staving off illness with colloidal silver, the Mayo Clinic clearly says the stuff isn’t safe or effective for anything basically. “Silver has no known purpose in the body. It's not an essential mineral.”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center reports side effects of using colloidal silver that include: seizures, skin burns, near renal failure, hospitalization, neuropathy, acute myeloid leukemia, and death.

The most infamous side effect from using colloidal silver is argyria, a condition that can permanently turn the skin of the user a bluish-gray.

Owens began her rant against vaccines, HPV, and tetanus after being called out by Meghan McCain for being “owned by Trump” after former President Donald Trump told Owens during an interview that he believed in the COVID-19 vaccine, even calling results “very good.”

Owens explained to her followers that the former president’s opinions should be dismissed as just a product of his generation, which didn’t have TV or the internet to do independent research.

The irony here is great because colloidal silver was the cure-all used before the advent of antibiotics in 1928 when Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin.

We’d have thought that Stan Jones, a former libertarian candidate for Senate in Montana whose face turned blue after he repeatedly used colloidal silver in 1999, would be enough of a deterrent, but I guess Owens didn’t do that research. Jones believed he should take the silver to ward off infection as a precaution against shortages of antibiotics from Y2K and the impending anarchy.

Owens is in the fatuous company of Info Wars chief Alex Jones. The Daily Beast reports that in 2020, Jones got a warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) telling him to stop promoting colloidal silver products on his website as a cure for COVID-19.

Jones was selling products such as “Superblue Silver Immune Gargle,” “Super Silver Whitening Toothpaste,” “Super Silver Wound Dressing Gel,” and “Superblue Fluoride-Free Toothpaste.”

Disgraced TV televangelist Jim Bakker also peddled colloidal silver as a cure for COVID-19 until the Missouri Attorney General's Office sued him.

According to The Washington Post, Bakker advertised colloidal silver products for as much as $125.

Bakker invited “naturopathic doctor” Sherril Sellman on to his show to discuss the benefits of the products in fighting the coronavirus.

Sellman admitted that the products hadn’t been tested on COVID-19, but said it had been tested on other strains of the coronavirus and had been able to eliminate it within 12 hours. “Totally eliminate it, kills it. Deactivates it,” she said, adding that the government has “proven” that the product “has the ability to kill every pathogen it has ever been tested on, including SARS and HIV.”

Willliam LeGate posted on Twitter that Owens gave specific instructions to a commenter on Instagram, telling the fan that she takes a “teaspoon a day,” and “more when I’m sick.”

Article reprinted with permission from Daily Kos

New Anti-Vax Disinformation Video Got 30 Million Views On Social Media

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

A viral video pushing misleading claims about coronavirus vaccines and masks has earned at least 30 million views from uploads directly on mainstream social media platforms. In addition to this extensive view count, the video has also seemingly received millions of Facebook engagements despite these platforms' rules against coronavirus misinformation.

Previously, Facebook claimed that it would remove content from its platform that pushes false claims about vaccines. YouTube has said it prohibits content "about COVID-19 that poses a serious risk of egregious harm" or "contradicts local health authorities' or the World Health Organization's (WHO) medical information about COVID-19." TikTok has said it prohibits "misinformation related to COVID-19, vaccines, and anti-vaccine disinformation," and Twitter has said it prohibits "false or misleading information about COVID-19 which may lead to harm."

Despite those rules, the new video promoting lies about the pandemic and vaccines has already spread extensively on these platforms in just a few days.

The viral video features a man named Dan Stock -- who has said he was at the United States Capitol building during the January 6 insurrection -- speaking in front of an Indiana city's school board, where he makes multiple false claims. Calling himself a "functional family medicine physician," Stock falsely suggested that coronavirus vaccines were not effective, saying, "Why is a vaccine that is supposedly so effective having a breakout in the middle of the summer when respiratory viral syndromes don't do that?" He also falsely claimed, "People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection actually get no benefit from vaccination at all," and inaccurately alleged that masks do not work, saying that "coronavirus and all other respiratory viruses ... are spread by aerosol particles, which are small enough to go through every mask." And rather than vaccines, Stock suggested people use the drug ivermectin to treat COVID-19 -- which the FDA has specifically advised against.

A review by Media Matters found that the video has earned tens of millions of views from direct uploads on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and TikTok combined.

On Instagram, uploads of the video have earned more than 4.6 million combined views. One upload, from right-wing host Sebastian Gorka, has received more than 3.5 million views alone. (In fact, Gorka's uploads of the clip on Instagram and Twitter appear to have contributed to nearly 30 percent of the known views of native uploads on mainstream social media platforms.) Another Instagram upload has nearly half a million views alone. And "Disinformation Dozen" member Sherri Tenpenny, who is ban evading on the platform, got thousands of views for her upload of the video.

Gorka Instagram Stock video

Uploads have also circulated on Facebook, with copies of the video earning at least 100,000 views. A page called Hancock County Indiana Patriots, which claims to have first uploaded the viral clip, got more than 90,000 views for its upload of the video which was then shared by John Jacob, a Republican member of the Indiana House of Representatives. (Jacob also earned thousands of views for his own upload of the video.)

John Jacob Hancock County Indiana Patriots Facebook Stock video

On YouTube, uploads of the video have earned at least 6.5 million views. One version earned well over 3.6 million views before it was taken down for violating YouTube's community guidelines. Multiple uploads of the video -- including the one with millions of views -- also carried ads, meaning YouTube had profited off of spreading these harmful COVID misinformation claims.

Dan Stock YouTube video ads1

On Twitter, uploads of the video have received more than 5.5 million views. Similar to Instagram shares, most of the Twitter views come from an upload by Gorka which was shared on the platform by Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) and The Daily Wire's Candace Owens, among others. Gorka's upload was ultimately blocked from being shared on Twitter, but only after days of remaining active.

Jordan Gorka Twitter Stock video

And on TikTok, one user's upload of the video (divided into two parts) earned roughly 14 million views alone. A member of the major TikTok conservative group Republican Hype House also uploaded the video, getting thousands of views.

TikTok Stock video

That a new coronavirus misinformation video was not just able to go viral but apparently surpass the wide spread of previous COVID conspiracy theory videos suggests that many social media platforms continue to struggle with enforcing their policies against misinformation about vaccines and COVID-19. Similarly, the video's ongoing reach shows that efforts by these platforms to label or take it down are not happening nearly fast enough to contain the spread of such harmful misinformation.

Research contributions from Olivia Little, Camden Carter, Spencer Silva, Nena Beecham, Jeremy Tuthill, Kayla Gogarty & Carly Evans.

Parler Is The New Gab — A Far-Right Hive Of Scum And Villainy

Reprinted with permission from DailyKos

Parler, the Twitter-like social-media platform, only exists to service the American right's paranoia-fueled persecution complex, especially the belief that mainstream platforms censor their ideas. After all, it was created ostensibly to give people who had been banned from Twitter or Facebook a new home.

So it's probably not a surprise that, in the post-election period, it's become a massive cesspool of violent seditious rhetoric advocating for a military coup to defend Donald Trump's presidency, and a civil war in which many of them say they intend to murder every liberal in the country.

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Right-Wing Grifters Using ’Stolen Election’ To Scam Republican Suckers

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

Democrats did not "steal" the presidential election, but that hasn't stopped right-wing personalities from grifting their followers by asking for money to supposedly help President Donald Trump stage a coup and overturn the results.

Media Matters has documented over the years how conservative media figures have frequently grifted and scammed their audiences. So it's no surprise that right-wingers have seized on Trump's lies about the "stolen" 2020 election to get money from readers.

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