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Tag: paul ryan

Trump Blasts Former Speaker Ryan As A ‘Curse’ On Party

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Former President Donald Trump is not pleased with former House Speaker Paul Ryan's remarks suggesting that it is time for the Republican Party to move on from the controversial Trump presidency.

On Friday, Trump released a statement targeting Ryan, whom he refers to as a "RINO" — a Republican in Name Only. The former president lambasted Ryan, although the former speaker did not criticize Trump by name.

Trump also attempted to blame Ryan, who was a candidate for vice president, for the political party's loss in 2012 as he insisted that he shouldn't be the person to offer advice about the future of the party.

In the statement, Trump said, "Paul Ryan has been a curse to the Republican Party. He has no clue as to what needs to be done for our Country, was a weak and ineffective leader, and spends all of his time fighting Republicans as opposed to Democrats who are destroying our Country."

Trump's fiery remarks came less than a day after Ryan's speech at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library. During his speech, Ryan acknowledged the "crossroads" the party is facing.

"Once again, we conservatives find ourselves at a crossroads. And here's one reality we have to face: If the conservative cause depends on the populist appeal of one personality, or on second-rate imitations, then we're not going anywhere," Ryan said on Thursday, May 28.

Though the speech was interpreted as a criticism of the GOP's direction under Trump, it did not attack the former president by name. In, fact, when he did name Trump, it was to praise him: "To his credit, Donald Trump brought many new voters into our party."

Ryan was, however, critical of Trump's allies in Congress and elsewhere, saying people "will not be impressed by the sight of yes-men and flatterers flocking to Mar-a-Lago." And he did say: "It was horrifying to see a presidency come to such a dishonorable and disgraceful end."

Of course, the former House speaker also criticized President Biden.

"In 2020, the country wanted a nice guy who would move to the center and depolarize our politics," Ryan said. "Instead, we got a nice guy pursuing an agenda more leftist than any president in my lifetime."

Former Speaker Ryan Raising Funds For Trump Critic Kinzinger

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois is one of former President Donald Trump's most outspoken critics in the Republican Party, and Trump supporters would love to remove him from Congress via a GOP primary in the 2022 midterms. But the conservative congressman has some allies on the right, including former House Speaker Paul Ryan — who according to Politico's Shia Kapos, will head a fundraiser for Kinzinger this Monday, May 24.

Kapos explains, "It's a decisive move against ex-President Donald Trump, who has set his sights on Republicans who voted to impeach him. Kinzinger is one of 10 Republicans who joined Democrats to impeach Trump for his role in the January 6 attack on the Capitol. The Illinois Republican has continued to carry the anti-Trump mantle, and it's no surprise that Ryan would back Kinzinger. Ryan, who's had a long-running feud with Trump, criticized Republicans who wouldn't certify the Electoral College results that validated Joe Biden's election as president."

Kinzinger has been a major thorn in Trump's side. Following the 2020 presidential election, Kinzinger called out Trump's debunked claims of widespread voter fraud as total nonsense and acknowledged Joe Biden as president-elect. And after the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol Building, Kinzinger and Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming were among the minority of House Republicans who championed Trump's impeachment.

In 2018, Ryan — who was House speaker at the time and had been Mitt Romney's running mate in the 2012 presidential election — announced that he would not be seeking reelection. Ryan said that he wanted to spend more time with his family, but it was obvious that he was disenchanted with Trumpism and believed that the 2018 midterms would be bad for Republicans.

Republicans Put Each Other On Blast As Party Erupts Over Trump

While the 117th Congress began its first working day, every member of the Republican caucus in both houses confronted a moral quandary: Promote Trump and my own ambitions, or defend the Constitution I swore to protect.

The day began with former House Speaker Paul Ryan blasting the efforts of some of his fellow Republicans to overturn a free and fair election.

In a blistering statement, Ryan:

"Efforts to reject the votes of the Electoral College and sow doubt about Joe Biden's victory strike at the foundation of our republic. It is difficult to conceive of a more anti-democratic and anti-conservative act than a federal intervention to overturn the results of state-certified elections and disenfranchise millions of Americans. The Trump campaign had ample opportunity to challenge election results, and those efforts failed from lack of evidence. The legal process was exhausted, and the results were decisively confirmed. The Department of Justice, too, found no basis for overturning the result. If states wish to reform their processes for future elections, that is their prerogative. But Joe Biden's victory is entirely legitimate."
Ryan, who served as Speaker during the first two years of Trump's term, has largely avoided commenting on the news since leaving office, though he did urge soon to be ex-President Trump to accept the results of the election in March, according to The Hill. That was only be the start of a long day that revealed a deepening GOP divide.

Rep. Thomas Massie, a Kentucky Republican, released a joint statement revealing his concern over some of his colleagues planning to overturn the election on January 6 in a vote that is supposed to be ceremonial.

"We, like most Americans, are outraged at the significant abuses in our election system resulting from the reckless adoption of mail-in ballots and the lack of safeguards maintained to guarantee that only legitimate votes are cast and counted," read Massie's statement, released jointly with several colleges including two who signed the amicus brief asking the Supreme Court to throw out votes in states Trump lost.

"But only states have authority to appoint electors," the letter continued. "Our job on January 6 is to determine whether these are the electors the states sent us, not whether these are the electors the states should have sent us," wrote Massie and his colleagues.




Rep. Chip Roy, a Republican from Texas, signed Massie's statement but took his displeasure at the effort to overturn the election a step further -- by releasing his own statement shredding the hypocrisy of many swing-state colleagues. He made a symbolic but strong statement opposing their seating in the new Congress.

"After all, those representatives [who oppose confirming the electoral vote] were elected through the very same systems -- with the same ballot procedures, with the same signature validations, with the same broadly applied decisions of executive and judicial branch officials-- as were the electors chosen for the President of the United States under the laws of those states, which have become the subject of national controversy," Roy's letter read.



Danziger: Of The People, By The People, For The People

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.com.

Danziger: Rolling On The House Floor, Laughing

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.com.

Danziger: The Elephant In The Room

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.com.

House Chaplain Will Stay — After Sending Tough Letter To Ryan

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet.

House Speaker Paul Ryan has accepted the un-resignation of House Chaplain Patrick Conroy, who issued the speaker a scathing letter withdrawing his previously tendered resignation.

Conroy says that he never spoke to Ryan about his resignation or termination but that his chief of staff Jonathan Burks requested that the chaplain step down. Asked why, Burks reportedly responded, “Maybe it’s time we had a chaplain that wasn’t a Catholic.” Burks also reportedly mentioned a prayer Conroy led in November 2017 ahead of the tax reform vote.

The chaplain had prayed for “balanced” tax reform that helps ameliorate income inequality. The tax bill that Republicans eventually passed added more than an estimated $1 trillion to the deficit while delivering the largest gains to wealthy people and corporations.

Conroy writes that he initially felt that he had “little choice” but to resign, but he now says that he would like to return to work unless fired “for cause.” He notes that though Ryan said Conroy’s “pastoral services” had been insufficient as the reason for his departure, the chaplain says he was never given any indication that he wasn’t living up to his duties. If he had been instructed on how he was failing or where he could improve, he says, he would have worked to correct his conduct.

In a statement, Ryan said he has accepted the letter and that Conroy will remain as chaplain. He said, “My original decision was made in what I believe to be the best interest of the institution. To be clear, that decision was based on my duty to ensure that the House has the kind of pastoral services it deserves.”

Read the full letter here:

Caroline O.@RVAwonk

is a good time to remember that more than 80% of white evangelical Christians voted for the thrice-married candidate who maybe had a love child, definitely paid off a porn star, & openly admitted he hasn’t been to church in yearshttps://shareblue.com/evangelicals-stormy-daniels-trump-midterm-elections/ 

NH Mountain Gal@NHmountaingal

At least House chaplain Fr. Conroy rescinded his resignation. Here is his pointed (and blistering) letter: pic.twitter.com/YWGrsV49tW

View image on TwitterView image on Twitter

Pastors Rebuke Ryan Over Firing Of Catholic Chaplain

Paul Ryan’s ostensible support for religious liberty was exposed as a façade when he forced the House chaplain to resign. Now, Christian pastors are reproaching him for trying “to silence the Word of God.”

Ryan reportedly threatened Father Patrick Conroy with firing if he didn’t step down on his own. The impetus appeared to be Conroy’s denouncement of the GOP tax bill during a daily prayer last November.

Indeed, as one senior Democratic aide told Shareblue Media, “We believe he was pushed out because he was praying for justice and fairness.”

Such an act would seem to be in direct opposition of the religious ideals Ryan touts. And two Christian pastors are taking him to task for it.

In a letter to Ryan posted at Medium, Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II of Repairers of the Breach and Minister Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove of School for Conversion labeled Ryan’s forced ouster of Conroy as nothing less than a “true attack on religious liberty.”

Conroy told The New York Times Ryan admonished him after his prayer for the poor, telling him, “Padre, you just got to stay out of politics.”

But Barber and Wilson-Hartgrove say it’s difficult to see “how you can read the Bible and stay out of politics.”

They quote Isaiah 10: “Woe unto you who legislate evil and rob the poor, making widows and orphans your prey.” The men also remind Ryan of Jeremiah 22, when God told him, “Do what is just and right. Rescue from the hand of the oppressor the one who has been robbed.”

They highlight Jesus’ questions from the gospel of Matthew: “When I was hungry, did you feed me? When I was thirsty, did you give me something to drink?” And the epistle of James is even clearer: “The wages you failed to pay the workers who mowed your fields are crying out against you.”

Indeed, Barber and Wilson-Hartgrove point to “over 2,000 verses in the Bible” demanding justice for the poor. And they note the long history of religious involvement in social justice movements.

“If preachers had stayed out of politics, we wouldn’t have had the abolition movement to end slavery and win the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments. We wouldn’t have women’s suffrage, civil rights protections, Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid.”

But today, Ryan and his Republican colleagues — who blocked an investigation into Conroy’s firing — have shunted that history to the side in favor of cruel partisanship.

“Speaker Ryan, who claims to champion religious liberty, has acted to silence the moral truth of Scripture,” the pastors declare. And if Conroy had to go, so too would “Moses and Isaiah, Deborah and Jesus, Frederick Douglass and Francis Perkins, Dorothy Day and Martin Luther King.”

But Ryan’s attempt to silence Conroy didn’t work on Barber and Wilson-Hartgrove, nor on their organizations.

“As preachers we cannot remain silent while those with political power try to silence the Word of God.”

It’s not the first time Ryan’s antagonism to the values he claims to uphold has been challenged by religious authorities. And the condemnation is well deserved, considering the dearth of compassionand empathy evident in his politics.

Perhaps in retirement, Ryan will have some time to review the Scripture that Barber and Wilson-Hartgrove put forth — since he seems to have forgotten it.