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Sen. Ted Cruz

Reprinted with permission from American Independent

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) claims that he was doing his "duty" when he objected to certified election results showing Joe Biden had been elected president, as part of an attempt to overturn the election the Republican Party lost.

Cruz appeared on the syndicated "Joe Pags Show" and was asked by the host if he felt he had done "something wrong" by objecting to the certification of voting results on Jan. 6.

"I did my duty," Cruz replied, adding, "I stood up and fought for the men and women of Texas, for 29 million Texans."

If successful, Cruz's actions, along with his fellow Republicans in the House and Senate, would have ignored the will of over 81 million voters who voted for now-President Biden.

Cruz went on to advocate for an "emergency 10-day audit" which would have examined alleged claims of voter fraud "to assess them on the merits."

But multiple legal challenges in the post-election period initiated by Donald Trump, the Republican Party, and their allies attempted to do just that. They repeatedly failed in court, with multiple judges indicating a lack of evidence to support allegations of wrongdoing.

Some of the judges who ruled against the Trump team were appointed to the federal judiciary by Trump himself.

For his role in attempting to overturn the election, alongside Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO), Cruz has faced calls to resign from the Senate. Cruz and Hawley are also the subjects of an ethics complaint filed by seven senators, which calls for the Senate Ethics Committee to investigate their role in inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol attack that killed five.

From the Jan. 22 edition of Compass Media Networks' "The Joe Pags Show":

JOE PAGS: But let's go to Jan. 6, Ted do you feel like you did something wrong on Jan. 6?
TED CRUZ: I did my duty. I stood up and fought for the men and women of Texas, for 29 million Texans. And what I urged Congress to do, this is still the path I think we should have taken, which is to appoint an election commission to conduct an emergency 10-day audit, to examine all of the claims that have been made of voter fraud, to examine the evidence, and to assess them on the merits.
And I think that would have been a much better outcome, because it would have produced much greater confidence in the election, much greater faith in the integrity of the election.
Unfortunately, Senate Democrats didn't want to hear that at all, they wanted to charge ahead.
PAGS: Yeah.
CRUZ: And so, Congress chose not to do that. I think we find ourselves instead in a much more divided time as a result of Congress not going down that path.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

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