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Former Attorney General William Barr

Photo by The United States Department of Justice (Public domain)

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

The Inspector General of the Department of Justice has announced he will launch an investigation into the DOJ spying on prominent Democratic members of Congress during the Trump administration's time in office. Those incidents include obtaining subpoenas for communications data from at least 12 people, including Democratic lawmakers, their staff members, family members, and at least one minor child.

Attorneys General Jeff Sessions and Bill Barr, according to a New York Times report Thursday, were central to these incidents of spying taking place.

Among those targeted by Sessions and Barr were Democratic Congressmen Adam Schiff and Eric Swalwell, both of California.

Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz, Axios reports, made the announcement on Friday. Horowitz was first appointed to that position by President Barack Obama. The announcement says the investigation will include DOJ's similar efforts on members of the media.

"The DOJ Office of the Inspector General (OIG) is initiating a review of DOJ's use of subpoenas and other legal authorities to obtain communication records of Members of Congress and affiliated persons, and the news media in connection with recent investigations of alleged unauthorized disclosures of information to the media by government officials. The review will examine the Department's compliance with applicable DOJ policies and procedures, and whether any such uses, or the investigations, were based upon improper considerations. If circumstances warrant, the OIG will consider other issues that may arise during the review."

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