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Watching a TV news host try to talk sense to Donald Trump feels like seeing victims thrown to the lions in the Roman Coliseum: They’ll do their best — but they just don’t have a chance.

On Sunday, Chuck Todd faced off (over the phone) against Trump, concerning The Donald’s widely debunked claims that Muslims in New Jersey held mass celebrations on the day of 9/11. Todd tried an earnest, but probably hopeless tack: by appealing to civic responsibility and the seriousness of seeking the presidency.

“You’re running for president of the United States — your words matter,” Chuck said. “Truthfulness maters. Fact-based stuff matters.”

“Chuck, Chuck, take it easy Chuck — just play cool,” The Donald shot back, as he insisted that he’s heard about this from people, and it’s totally for real.

“I have a very good memory, Chuck. I have to tell you, I have a very good memory. I saw it somewhere on television — many years ago — and I never forgot it.”

Video via Meet the Press/NBC News.

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