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Mark Meadows

Photo by Gage Skidmore/ CC BY-SA 2.0

Debra Meadows was a busy bee in 2020. According to the North Carolina Board of Elections, on October 26, Debbie showed up at the Macon County community building in Franklin, North Carolina, and filled out a one-stop voter application for early voting in the 2020 presidential election. She claimed she lived in Scaly Mountain in a 14-foot by 62-foot mobile home. The problem was … she didn’t.

According to North Carolina state law, in order to vote in that state, you must reside in the claimed address for at least 30 days prior to the election. Again, she didn’t. Debbie must not have read the top of the voter form either, which clearly states: “fraudulently or falsely completing this form is a Class I felony under Chapter 163 of the NC general statutes.”

Debbie additionally dropped off an absentee ballot for her hubby Mark Meadows, who was then the White House chief of staff for failed President Donald Trump.

This is just the latest in a long list of discoveries regarding Mark and Debbie and their shady-as-hell voting practices.

As first reported by The New Yorker’s Charles Bethea, Meadows does not own the Scaly Mountain property, which sits in the southern Appalachian mountains. Debbie did rent the house for a couple of months, but as the unnamed owner of the house told The New Yorker, “He [Mark Meadows] did not come. He’s never spent a night in there.” The Meadows family did stay at the home in the fall of 2020 when they were in the area for a Trump rally as nearby hotels were mostly booked.

According to The News & Observer, Meadows is still registered to vote at the mobile home address.

As The Washington Post’s Fact Checker reporting shows, Debbie signed not one, not two, but three forms fraudulently. First a voter registration form, then an absentee ballot request for Mark, and then the one-stop application—a form that’s intended to warn someone of the legal ramifications of knowingly falsely signing.

Debbie voted in the 2020 primary runoff using the false mobile home address; Mark signed a voter registration form but did not end up actually voting in the primary.

Prior to the election on September 19, 2020, the Meadows listed a P.O. box in a town about 70 miles away from the mobile home near Asheville, North Carolina, as their mailing address, and listed the move-in date to the mobile home as the following day: September 20. But in March 2020, the Meadows sold their Sapphire, North Carolina, home, meaning they didn't actually live in the state. They in fact lived at the time in their recently purchased condominium in Old Town Alexandria in Virginia.

As the Post reports, Debbie used the Sapphire registration to vote in a June primary runoff election for someone she’d done fundraising for.

“We are early into the investigation,” Anjanette Grube, the SBI’s public information director, told the Post. “As the investigation continues, information will be shared with the prosecutor who will make a determination as to whether any additional persons could be subject to the investigation.”

Last month, Pamela Moses, 44, was sentenced to six years in prison for trying to register to vote.

Moses, a longtime Black Lives Matter activist in Memphis, Tennessee, told The Guardian that what happened to her was a straight-up “scare tactic” designed to keep her—and people who look like her—from voting.

In 2019, Lanisha Diresha Bratcher was charged with felony voter fraud. Jones had served time for a felony offense and was out on probation when she tried to vote. She learned then that under North Carolina regulations, as a convicted felon, she wasn’t allowed to vote. However, she hadn’t been informed of that when she registered to vote in 2016.

Reprinted with permission from Daily Kos

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons, a novel and a memoir. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

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