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Nikki Haley

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Former President Donald Trump's former Ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, is being strongly criticized after telling Fox News, "I don't even think there's a basis for impeachment." Trump incited the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol that resulted in five deaths, including the killing of a police officer. At least 134 law enforcement officers were assaulted during the attempted coup. And a majority of voters, 52 percent, blame Trump for the attack.

But according to Haley, Trump deserves "a break," and those who support conviction in his Senate trial should instead just "move on."

Trump's seditious actions after the election "were not great," Haley conceded to Fox News' Laura Ingraham Monday night, despite Trump literally lying for months to the American people so much that the vast majority of Republicans falsely think Democrats stole the election.

For the first time in American history, there was not a peaceful transfer of power, and yet Haley say Trump "absolutely" does not deserve to be impeached.

And she is playing the GOP's hand, attacking Democrats with President Joe Biden's call for unity.

"Now they're going to turn around and bring about impeachment yet they say they're for unity," she whines, insisting Americans' demands for accountability in the wake of Trump's insurrection are "only dividing our country."


Haley was destroyed on social media.
















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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

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