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Gigi Gaskins, proprietor of Hatworks

Screenshot from @hatwrksnashville on Instagram.

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

A Nashville, Tennessee store is under fire after promoting its latest product, wearable yellow Stars of David, mimicking the Nazi symbol Jews were forced to wear. It reads: not vaccinated. Just days ago Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA), said having to wear a mask during the pandemic was "exactly" like the Holocaust.

The company, which spells its name "hatWRKS," posted an image of the item on Instagram, saying, "patches are here!! they turned out great. $5ea. string adhesive back …. we'll be offering trucker caps soon."

Hitler's Nazis murdered an estimated 6 million Jews during the Holocaust, from 1941-1945.

Hours after the post promoting the stars went up, the store published a second post that appears to be a defense of the stars. In all text on a yellow background, it asks if the people "who are so outraged by my post…are outraged by the tyranny the world is experiencing?"

That "tyranny" is being forced to wear a mask in public during a pandemic that has killed over 600,000 people in the U.S. and more than 3.5 million worldwide. Masks are proven to greatly reduce the spread of the virus, and may also protect the wearer.

That second post also claims that "offering silence & compliance … is the worst crime."

"i will delete your disgust and hope you put it where it belongs," the post concludes.

NCRM will not link directly to the store's posts or to the store.

Historian Kevin Kruse weighed in:

National security attorney Bradley Moss:

U.S. Naval War College professor and international affairs specialist:

On Instagram the commenters are equally furious and horrified:

Please stop trivializing the extermination of millions of humans in the most egregious act of genocide the world has ever seen."

"this is repulsive"

"You are out of your fucking mind."

"Antisemitic trash."

"you're desperate to look like a victim, when in fact you're a willful pathogen spreader with no regard for your community. Good job dragging a historical tragedy through the mud"

"What the hell is wrong with you? You're NOT a Jew in a concentration camp. No one is going to gas you and burn your body. This is vile."

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum published an "Open Letter To American Leaders and Citizens From A Community Of Holocaust Survivors."

"We are seeing an alarming confluence of events that we never imagined we would witness in our adopted homeland," the 50 members write warning of "unchecked antisemitism" and "targeted violence."

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