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Rudy Giuliani

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet

Rudy Giuliani, former President Donald Trump's embattled former personal attorney, has admitted under oath that his so-called evidence of voter fraud was based on Facebook posts, reports confirm.

According to Business Insider, Giuliani's remarks were part of a deposition that he completed on August 14 as part of a defamation lawsuit filed by Eric Coomer, a former Dominion Voting Systems employee.

Coomer filed his lawsuit against the Trump campaign and other allies of the former president for circulating unfounded voter fraud conspiracy theories about the 2020 presidential election. One theory even accused him of conspiring to "rig" the election in President Joe Biden's favor.

The deposition included a statement where Giuliani "admitted that he got some of his information about Coomer's alleged role in the election fraud from his social media posts but couldn't be sure if it was Facebook or another platform."

"Those social media posts get all one to me," Giuliani said.

When asked if he'd personally seen any other information connecting Coomer to fraud, Giuliani said, "Right now, I can't recall anything else that I laid eyes on."

The New York Times reported that the conspiracy theory about Coomer originated from baseless claims made by a right-wing podcast host named Joe Oltmann. He claimed to have listened in on an Antifa conference call where Coomer's name was mentioned. During that discussion, "Eric from Dominion" reportedly boasted about interfering with the election. Oltmann then claimed Coomer's Facebook page included anti-Trump messages; a claim that tied into his alleged efforts to rig the election.

Although Oltmann provided no evidence to support his claim, Trump's legal team ran with it. On November 19, they held a press conference and offered details about the basis of their legal pushback which was motivated by Otlmann's baseless claims.

"One of the Smartmatic patent holders, Eric Coomer, I believe his name is, is on the web as being recorded in a conversation with ANTIFA members saying that he had the election rigged for Mr. Biden," Giuliani said.

However, Coomer's lawyers argue that Giuliani "spent 'virtually no time' investigating the claims."

When asked why he regurgitated the claims without conducting proper research, Giuliani simply said he was too busy.

"It's not my job in a fast-moving case to go out and investigate every piece of evidence that's given to me," Giuliani said in the deposition, according to MSNBC.

Giuliani also made a futile attempt to defend his actions saying, "Why wouldn't I believe him? I would have to have been a terrible lawyer… gee, let's go find out it's untrue. I didn't have the time to do that."

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