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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

The bipartisan House Select Committee on the January 6 Attack issued subpoenas to four of Donald Trump's closest deputies Thursday night, ordering them to produce documents and appear for depositions.

The four are Steve Bannon, Mark Meadows, Kash Patel, and Dan Scavino.

"Stephen Bannon," Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-MS) writes on the committee's official website, "reportedly communicated with former President Trump on December 30th, 2020, urging him to focus his efforts on January 6th. Mr. Bannon also reportedly attended a gathering at the Willard Hotel on January 5th, 2021, as part of an effort to persuade Members of Congress to block the certification of the election the next day. Mr. Bannon is also quoted as stating, on January 5th, that '[a]ll Hell is going to break loose tomorrow.'"


In his letter to Bannon, Chairman Thompson writes, the "inquiry includes examination of how various individuals and entities coordinated their activities leading up to the events of January 6, 2021."

Below is the letter from Chairman Thompson to Bannon, via NBC4 Washington Investigative Reporter Scott MacFarlane:

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