Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Tag:

Bolton Pays For Shielding Trump During Impeachment

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

For one magic moment, the eyes of the nation were on former National Security Adviser John Bolton. The impeachment of President Donald Trump was ongoing, and Bolton was known to have played a critical role behind the scenes of the Ukraine scheme at the heart of the proceedings' charges. Reports indicated that his potential testimony would be explosive.

But Bolton refused to testify before the House of Representatives' impeachment hearing, later saying he was only willing to testify for the Senate. Yet the Republican Party that would ultimately acquit Trump in the Senate refused to call any witnesses, so Bolton's voice was never heard. At a critical moment in the nation's history, Bolton chose to withhold potentially vital information from the public and from the officials tasked with adjudicating the president's fitness to serve.

Read Now Show less

Danziger: Bitter Fruit

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.com.

The ‘Lessons’ Trump Says He Learned From Being Impeached

Donald Trump admitted on Wednesday that he didn’t learn any lessons from being impeached by the House of Representatives, contradicting a reason Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) cited for voting to acquit him of all wrongdoing.

“What lessons did you learn from impeachment?” a reporter asked Trump in the Oval Office during a meeting with the president of Ecuador.

“That the Democrats are crooked,” he replied. “They’re vicious. That they shouldn’t have brought impeachment.”

Trump also falsely said that his poll numbers “are 10 points higher.” Trump’s average approval rating was 41.1 percent on Oct. 31, 2019, the day the House voted to open the impeachment inquiry. On Wednesday, it was 43.6 percent.

Trump was impeached for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The impeachment stemmed from allegations Trump withheld critical military aid from Ukraine in order to pressure the Ukrainian government to open a politically motivated investigation into former Vice President Joe Biden. Trump refused to hand over documents to Congress and ordered administration officials not to cooperate with the investigation.

Before voting to acquit Trump, Collins went on national television to declare “the president has learned from this case.” She said that Trump has been impeached and “that’s a pretty big lesson,” adding, “I believe that he will be much more cautious in the future.”

Earlier on Wednesday, Collins was asked what specific lessons she thought Trump learned from impeachment. She refused to answer, eventually closing the door on a reporter.

Since Collins and her Republican colleagues acquitted Trump, he has retaliated against multiple witnesses who provided Congress with evidence of his wrongdoing.

On Friday, Trump fired Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, a Ukrainian expert working at the White House who told Congress he was uncomfortable with Trump’s July 25 phone call where Trump asked the Ukrainian government to investigate Biden.

Later that day, Trump also fired U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland. Sondland told Congress that Trump was involved in a quid pro quo with Ukraine centered on a White House visit for the Ukrainian president in exchange for opening an investigation.

Earlier this week, Trump inserted himself into the Justice Department’s sentencing recommendation for his former campaign adviser, convicted felon Roger Stone. Stone was convicted of seven counts of witness tampering, lying to Congress, and obstruction of justice. The DOJ initially recommended up to nine years in prison, but subsequently reduced their recommendation after Trump called the punishment too harsh.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.


#EndorseThis: Kimmel Puts Trump On ‘It’s A Disgrace’ Loop

“Declaring a front-runner at this point is like picking aplastic surgeon based on two Yelp reviews,” says Jimmy Kimmel, who also notesthat Andrew Yang, Deval Patrick, and Michael Bennet have all dropped out of theDemocratic presidential primaries. Even with Bernie Sanders and Pete Buttigiegvying for the lead and Amy Klobuchar close behind, however, Trump remains focusedon high-rolling former New York Mike Bloomberg.

What really preoccupies the president at the moment isrevenge – on prosecutors who convicted his friend Roger Stone (who might have squealedabout him), and on the National Security Council aide who testified in Congress.Having fired Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman (and his brother), Trump went on tosuggest that the military should prosecute the decorated war veteran for…something.Since impeachment his abuses of power have not abated, as Republican Senators saidthey hoped, but intensified.

“Why do I get the feeling we’re going to have to impeachthis guy at least two more times before the election?” muses Kimmel. “He’sgoing for a three-peach! It has never been done.” As Trump would say – and hassaid over and over and over and over again – it’s a disgrace.

Click and chortle.