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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Conservative advocate Meshawn Maddock found herself at the center of controversy after highlighting a bogus voter fraud claim alleging that deceased voters had cast ballots in the 2020 presidential election. Like an overwhelming number of other Trump supporters, instead of verifying the validity of her claims, she aired her grievances on social media and left the public to do their own research.

According to the local news outlet Bridge Michigan, Maddock released a list of more than 150 names of voters. It also publicized the addresses of the voters Maddock claimed were dead. According to Maddock, her list derived from a larger file that contained more than 2,000 names of people she claimed "voted in Wayne County by absentee ballot that are CONFIRMED deceased,"


It did not take long for social media users to fire back at Maddock. The outcome is no different than the frivolous post-election lawsuits being filed in courts across the country. Social media users quickly realized the problem with the list of names she released: many of the voters were, in fact, alive. Viewers also noted that some of the residential locations Maddock claimed were in Wayne County were actually in Oakland County.

To make matters worse, she had also made those voters' private information visible. In fact, some of the listed voters even chimed in with critical remarks.

"I am certainly not dead!" wrote one woman. Another man also verified that two of the people on the list are actually people he knows personally who live in his neighborhood. "Two people in my neighborhood are on this list," he wrote. "They're very much alive. Hell, their boys play baseball with my sons."

Although Maddock deleted the post after receiving a warning from Facebook, she still opted to pivot from the obvious point which proves that her claim was baseless. In a text message to the publication, Maddock offered a delusional defense of her actions despite having no proof of voter fraud.

"This isn't about overturning the 2020 election," Maddock texted. "This is about never letting this happen again, and punishing those who have committed fraud."

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