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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

QAnon believers, also known for their adamant disapproval of COVID vaccinations, have been left befuddled by former President Donald Trump admitting that he'd taken the COVID vaccine booster shot.

Following Trump's appearance on Bill O'Reilly's No Spin News, Trump confirmed his third jab. When O'Reilly asked, "Did you get the booster?" Trump replied: "Yes. I got it too."

In addition to boos from the crowd, QAnon believers are speaking out. According to Newsweek, disgruntled QAnon believers have criticized and "turned on" Trump due to his latest announcement.

In wake of the latest controversy, John Sabal, also known as QAnon John, explained why he believes Trump made the decision as he suggested that it would be a form of "political suicide" if he publicly disavowed the COVID vaccine and booster shot. He also urged QAnon believers to make their own decision.

"Knowing what we know. Whenever POTUS 45 promotes something, the other side does the total opposite. They get disgusted by that thing," Sabal said. "Trump derangement still runs deep. Trump still says that those who don't want the vax should not be forced to take it. That is the most important thing he said. The messaging here is clear. Imagine for one second what would happen if Trump all of a sudden started to backtrack on the vax. Operation Warp Speed was necessary for reasons I already discussed. He would lose all credibility with those who took the jab. It would be political suicide for him."

One QAnon influencer offered a delusional explanation for the former president's remarks but also condemned his support of the vaccination. Sharing a message with his 58,000 followers on Telegram, he admitted that he disagreed with Trump but still expressed support for him.

"We don't always understand everything," the influencer said, per Newsweek. "I love President Trump. I disagree here. I think we may find out something about this soon imo [in my opinion] either way, think for yourself. You are in the right spot here. Just don't cuss up a storm, we have so many twists and turns already."

The influencer continued, "I believe the end will explain the middle. But, we are all to think for ourselves and most of you guys are still with me on this vax crap. If we are confused by Pres Trump's comments, I'm sure Deep State is. Maybe he would be a danger to society arrested otherwise idk [I don't know] but I'm gonna continue locally and here doing what we all must every day."

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

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