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Sanders Edges Buttigieg And Klobuchar In New Hampshire Primary

New Hampshire voters delivered a narrow but clear victory toSenator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) in Tuesday’s Democratic primary, as he edged outformer South Bend, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg for first place by less than 5,000votes. But the surprise of the nation’s first 2020 primary was a close thirdplace finish by Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), counted out by many observers onlya week ago, who now becomes a serious contender in the party’s more moderatewing.

Sanders and Buttigieg each earned nine of the state’s 24 conventiondelegates, while Klobuchar took the remaining six. Trailing badly behind thefront runners were Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) in fourth place and formerVice President Joe Biden in fifth. Biden left New Hampshire on Tuesday to flyto South Carolina, which will hold its primary on February 29.

With more than nine out of ten precincts counted, theWashington Post reported that Sanders had won with nearly 26 percent. Buttigieghad over 24 percent, Klobucher had almost 20 percent, Warren had just over nine percent and Biden had just overeight percent.

Not appearing on the New Hampshire ballot was former NewYork City mayor Mike Bloomberg. But the billionaire received enough write-in votesto win the hamlet of Dixville Notch, which traditionally reports its resultsshortly after midnight.

Finishing last among the Democratic contenders, tech entrepreneurAndrew Yang announced late Tuesday that he will end his quixotic bid for theparty’s nomination, which drew a small but loyal following. Senator MichaelBennet (D-CO) also said he would end his longshot bid.

#EndorseThis: Elizabeth Warren’s Fresh, Nasty Message To Donald Trump

That quintessential nasty woman, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), has a fresh message for Donald Trump. Sitting next to her at a New Hampshire rally, Hillary Clinton laughed and laughed. We think you will too, so click.

Hillary Clinton Enlists Former Foe Bernie Sanders In Rally For Youth Votes

By Jonathan Allen

DURHAM, N.H. (Reuters) – U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton shared a stage with former rival Senator Bernie Sanders on Wednesday to appeal for youth votes in the Nov. 8 election as opinion polls show a close race with Republican Donald Trump.

Clinton told an audience at the University of New Hampshire that she would make college affordable if she wins the White House, the kind of promise that won Sanders many young supporters during the Democratic nominating contest. “We should and we will make public colleges tuition-free for families earning less than $125,000 a year,” Clinton said. She vowed to help those who already have student debt to refinance.

Clinton’s campaign is worried that some polls show voters under the age of 30 might not turn out in great numbers at polling stations in November, potentially giving an advantage to Trump.

Members of the crowd on Wednesday waved signs that read: “I will vote.”

Recent opinion polls have shown the race tightening between Clinton, a former secretary of state, U.S. senator and first lady, and Trump, a New York real estate magnate.

A majority of Americans say Clinton won Monday night’s presidential debate, but her performance does not appear to have boosted support among likely voters, according to a Reuters/Ipsos national tracking poll released on Wednesday.

The online poll found that 56 percent of American adults felt Clinton did a better job, compared with 26 percent who believed the Republican did better.

Even so, Clinton’s performance seemed to have little impact on her support. The poll showed 42 percent supported her, while 38 percent backed Trump.

Trump, often described as racist by Clinton, tried to turn the tables at a rally in Waukesha, Wisconsin.

He pointed to the Democrat’s remark that “implicit bias is a problem for everyone, not just the police,” when asked at the debate whether she believed police are implicitly biased against black people.

“She accuses the entire country, including all of law enforcement, of ‘implicit bias,’ essentially suggesting that everyone, including our police, are basically racist and prejudiced,” Trump said.

Clinton’s event with Sanders took place on a university campus, but it was not open to students without an invitation, according to attendees, many of whom were middle-aged and said they were members of local Democratic organizations or invited by the campaign.

Clinton praised Sanders, a U.S. senator from Vermont who was her opponent in the hard-fought struggle for the Democratic nomination earlier this year.

“He is one of the most passionate champions for equality and justice that I have ever seen and someone that I am looking forward to working with,” Clinton said of Sanders, who introduced her on Wednesday.

Although Sanders lost to Clinton, he consistently drew younger voters to his side with promises to take on Wall Street, make college less expensive and close the income gap.

He called on young people in New Hampshire, a swing state in the presidential election, to get behind Clinton.

“Get your uncles, your aunts, get your friends to vote for Hillary Clinton,” he said.

Clinton’s campaign said it hoped to get Sanders to make more appearances on Clinton’s behalf before the election.

(Additional reporting by Chris Kahn in New York and Steve Holland in Iowa; Writing by Alistair Bell; Editing by Peter Cooney and Bill Rigby)

IMAGE: U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton listens as U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders speaks about college affordability during a campaign event at the University of New Hampshire in Durham, New Hampshire, United States September 28, 2016.  REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Sanders To Join Clinton In New Hampshire Presidential Rally

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders plans to join fellow Democrat Hillary Clinton on Tuesday at a rally in New Hampshire, their campaigns said, an appearance where he is expected to endorse his rival after a hard-fought presidential primary campaign.

Sanders and Clinton will discuss “their commitment to building an America that is stronger together and an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top,” according to a statements released early on Monday from both campaigns.

Sanders, of Vermont, has resisted endorsing the former U.S. secretary of state, senator and first lady, since she clinched the Democratic nomination last month. Instead, he chose to continue his campaign as leverage to win concessions on his progressive policy agenda and reforms to the Democratic Party’s nominating process.

In a speech to supporters last month, Sanders vowed to help Clinton defeat Republican Donald Trump in the Nov. 8 presidential election but did not end his campaign.

Other prominent Democrats have rallied around Clinton, including President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren, a favorite of the party’s liberal wing.

Reporting by Doina Chiacu; Editing by Lisa Von Ahn

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders shake hands before the start of the Democratic presidential candidates debate in Durham, New Hampshire, February 4, 2016.  REUTERS/Carlo Allegri