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Protesters Greet Trump With ‘One-Finger Salutes’ On Journey To New Hampshire

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

President Donald Trump was traveling to New Hampshire Friday evening where he will held a short rally, then headed back home to the White House.

As the presidential motorcade made its way to Joint Base Andrews to board Air Force One the White House press pool released some very descriptive details.

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Sanders Edges Buttigieg And Klobuchar In New Hampshire Primary

New Hampshire voters delivered a narrow but clear victory toSenator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) in Tuesday’s Democratic primary, as he edged outformer South Bend, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg for first place by less than 5,000votes. But the surprise of the nation’s first 2020 primary was a close thirdplace finish by Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), counted out by many observers onlya week ago, who now becomes a serious contender in the party’s more moderatewing.

Sanders and Buttigieg each earned nine of the state’s 24 conventiondelegates, while Klobuchar took the remaining six. Trailing badly behind thefront runners were Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) in fourth place and formerVice President Joe Biden in fifth. Biden left New Hampshire on Tuesday to flyto South Carolina, which will hold its primary on February 29.

With more than nine out of ten precincts counted, theWashington Post reported that Sanders had won with nearly 26 percent. Buttigieghad over 24 percent, Klobucher had almost 20 percent, Warren had just over nine percent and Biden had just overeight percent.

Not appearing on the New Hampshire ballot was former NewYork City mayor Mike Bloomberg. But the billionaire received enough write-in votesto win the hamlet of Dixville Notch, which traditionally reports its resultsshortly after midnight.

Finishing last among the Democratic contenders, tech entrepreneurAndrew Yang announced late Tuesday that he will end his quixotic bid for theparty’s nomination, which drew a small but loyal following. Senator MichaelBennet (D-CO) also said he would end his longshot bid.

#EndorseThis: Elizabeth Warren’s Fresh, Nasty Message To Donald Trump

That quintessential nasty woman, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), has a fresh message for Donald Trump. Sitting next to her at a New Hampshire rally, Hillary Clinton laughed and laughed. We think you will too, so click.

Hillary Clinton Enlists Former Foe Bernie Sanders In Rally For Youth Votes

By Jonathan Allen

DURHAM, N.H. (Reuters) – U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton shared a stage with former rival Senator Bernie Sanders on Wednesday to appeal for youth votes in the Nov. 8 election as opinion polls show a close race with Republican Donald Trump.

Clinton told an audience at the University of New Hampshire that she would make college affordable if she wins the White House, the kind of promise that won Sanders many young supporters during the Democratic nominating contest. “We should and we will make public colleges tuition-free for families earning less than $125,000 a year,” Clinton said. She vowed to help those who already have student debt to refinance.

Clinton’s campaign is worried that some polls show voters under the age of 30 might not turn out in great numbers at polling stations in November, potentially giving an advantage to Trump.

Members of the crowd on Wednesday waved signs that read: “I will vote.”

Recent opinion polls have shown the race tightening between Clinton, a former secretary of state, U.S. senator and first lady, and Trump, a New York real estate magnate.

A majority of Americans say Clinton won Monday night’s presidential debate, but her performance does not appear to have boosted support among likely voters, according to a Reuters/Ipsos national tracking poll released on Wednesday.

The online poll found that 56 percent of American adults felt Clinton did a better job, compared with 26 percent who believed the Republican did better.

Even so, Clinton’s performance seemed to have little impact on her support. The poll showed 42 percent supported her, while 38 percent backed Trump.

Trump, often described as racist by Clinton, tried to turn the tables at a rally in Waukesha, Wisconsin.

He pointed to the Democrat’s remark that “implicit bias is a problem for everyone, not just the police,” when asked at the debate whether she believed police are implicitly biased against black people.

“She accuses the entire country, including all of law enforcement, of ‘implicit bias,’ essentially suggesting that everyone, including our police, are basically racist and prejudiced,” Trump said.

Clinton’s event with Sanders took place on a university campus, but it was not open to students without an invitation, according to attendees, many of whom were middle-aged and said they were members of local Democratic organizations or invited by the campaign.

Clinton praised Sanders, a U.S. senator from Vermont who was her opponent in the hard-fought struggle for the Democratic nomination earlier this year.

“He is one of the most passionate champions for equality and justice that I have ever seen and someone that I am looking forward to working with,” Clinton said of Sanders, who introduced her on Wednesday.

Although Sanders lost to Clinton, he consistently drew younger voters to his side with promises to take on Wall Street, make college less expensive and close the income gap.

He called on young people in New Hampshire, a swing state in the presidential election, to get behind Clinton.

“Get your uncles, your aunts, get your friends to vote for Hillary Clinton,” he said.

Clinton’s campaign said it hoped to get Sanders to make more appearances on Clinton’s behalf before the election.

(Additional reporting by Chris Kahn in New York and Steve Holland in Iowa; Writing by Alistair Bell; Editing by Peter Cooney and Bill Rigby)

IMAGE: U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton listens as U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders speaks about college affordability during a campaign event at the University of New Hampshire in Durham, New Hampshire, United States September 28, 2016.  REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Sanders To Join Clinton In New Hampshire Presidential Rally

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders plans to join fellow Democrat Hillary Clinton on Tuesday at a rally in New Hampshire, their campaigns said, an appearance where he is expected to endorse his rival after a hard-fought presidential primary campaign.

Sanders and Clinton will discuss “their commitment to building an America that is stronger together and an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top,” according to a statements released early on Monday from both campaigns.

Sanders, of Vermont, has resisted endorsing the former U.S. secretary of state, senator and first lady, since she clinched the Democratic nomination last month. Instead, he chose to continue his campaign as leverage to win concessions on his progressive policy agenda and reforms to the Democratic Party’s nominating process.

In a speech to supporters last month, Sanders vowed to help Clinton defeat Republican Donald Trump in the Nov. 8 presidential election but did not end his campaign.

Other prominent Democrats have rallied around Clinton, including President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren, a favorite of the party’s liberal wing.

Reporting by Doina Chiacu; Editing by Lisa Von Ahn

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders shake hands before the start of the Democratic presidential candidates debate in Durham, New Hampshire, February 4, 2016.  REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 

#EndorseThis: Trump’s Unfiltered Rally In New Hampshire

At a rally in Manchester, New Hampshire, Donald Trump was doing pretty well sticking to his prepared remarks about trade and the Mexican government, until he was distracted by a plane flying overhead.

“In fact, that could be a Mexican plane up there!” he said. “They’re getting ready to attack.”

You could almost hear Trump’s new campaign manager cringe.

Paul Manafort officially took over the campaign after the firing of his predecessor (and chair of the New Hampshire delegation to the Republican National Convention) Corey Lewandowski was unceremoniously fired recently. Manafort has promised that his candidate would “pivot” towards a more acceptable persona and more effective strategy for general election voters. But no one tells Donald Trump not to behave like a child.

It’s hard to stay scripted when unforeseen distractions like planes and audience questions get in the way. One woman suggested employing veterans to replace “heebeejabby” TSA workers –apparently a garbled reference to scarves worn by some Muslim women.

Trump replied, “I understand. And we are looking at that. We’re looking into a lot of things.”

Later, a New Hampshire man voiced his opposition to abortion and followed with, “I’m opposed to our wasting our military in the Middle East on behalf of Zionist Israel.” Trump rebutted the latter remark, saying that “Israel is a very important ally of the United States” and pledging “100 percent” protection of the Middle Eastern nation.

Trump has previously said that he would make Israel pay for defense aid (he backtracked on that statement later).

Manafort probably isn’t a huge fan of un-screened question and answer sessions.

Photo: Twitter/MSNBC

You Know What They Say About Men Who Make Jokes About Small Hands? Not Much, Anymore.

Marco Rubio, the one-time hope of the Republican Party establishment who gathered many of it’s endorsements, bowed — or crashed and burned, depending on your assessment — out of the Republican primary on Tuesday, following his pronounced loss to frontrunner Donald Trump in his home state of Florida.

His original 3-2-1 strategy (third place in Iowa, second in New Hampshire, first in South Carolina) had become a hodgepodge of primary medals that would’ve been more useful melted down and recast as a crowbar to threaten Floridian Republicans with.

Rubio’s end began a long time ago, though, when he not only stopped winning but also decided to give up the mantle of decency and focus on policy that he assumed his base would want, pre-Trump.

Instead, Rubio, who had been heralded as the JFK of the Republican party for being young, Hispanic, and conservative, succumbed to the rhetorical tropes of the man who will ultimately destroy his party, Donald Trump.

Indeed, it seems that the more politically incorrect and derogatory Trump is of his competitors, the more his supporters see him as “authentic.” As Jeffery Herf summarized in The American Interest:

“His followers took pleasure in his attacks on [Jeb] Bush not primarily because they disagreed with this or that policy, but because Trump gave them a way to dismiss Bush’s obvious strengths. Bush’s style, his intelligence, the size of his vocabulary, his seriousness and ability to speak knowledgeably about the details of problems—these were a constant challenge to those like Trump who lack the ability to do any of these things. Such strengths stir resentment and envy, reminding listeners of what they themselves do not understand. Trump’s insults made it possible for his followers to dismiss their discomfort over not understanding policy questions. They could be “big guys” despite their ignorance. This was very liberating.”

This may be reductive, but it’s telling: when Rubio made his last ditch effort to combat Trump, he emulated Trump’s style, embarking down the rhetorical road less eloquently taken.

Take, for example, the morning after a Republican debate in which Rubio and Ted Cruz tried their best to swing back at the Trump juggernaut:

Somewhat ironically, Rubio concluded his statements with a promise to campaign across “all fifty states, to all fifty territories in this country, if I have to get in my pickup truck and drive to all 50 states that remain, I will never allow the conservative movement to be taken over by a con artist. “

That’s beside the point. At least, it is now. As one of the biggest disappointments of this election cycle, Rubio is a walking demonstration of how resoundingly Republican primary voters have rejected the establishment candidates.

After resorting to bathroom “humor,” making jokes about foreign workers writing Trump’s tweets, and the aforementioned hand size incident, Rubio said he regretted these comments, noting “ I don’t want to be that.”

Not long after violence erupted at a Donald Trump rally in Chicago, Rubio offered some of the most pointed and critical commentary from a Republican candidate on Trump and the election:

His opening words give us a glimpse at what Republican primary voters are rejecting: attempts to soothe the anger of an electorate by actually attempting to make progress despite it. Rubio, a seriously flawed candidate in his own right, tried to represent a new outlook for the GOP, but instead fell into ever widening the chasm that now exists within the Republican Party.

Marco Rubio announced yesterday that he doesn’t have a future in politics, at least for now: He doesn’t want to be vice president. He’s not running for re-election in his current Senate seat. He is an ideology without a movement, and at least in that regard, he’s not alone.

Photo: Marco Rubio announces the suspension of his presidential campaign during a rally in Miami, Florida March 15, 2016.    REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

6 Newspapers: Dump Chris Christie

Chris Christie has long been loathed by New Jersey journalists.

At least those who sit on editorial boards.

Now that Christie has formally ended his campaign for president and — for some reason — endorsed Donald Trump, six newspapers, all owned by the Gannett chain, have called on the New Jersey Governor to resign.

As a governor, Christie’s extremely unpopular. As a presidential candidate, his bullish, pigheaded persona was overshadowed by the very man whom he now endorses — perhaps the only man on earth more bullish and pigheaded than Christie.

The newspapers — Asbury Park Press, Courier Post, Courier News, Home News Tribune, Daily Record, and the Daily Journal — cover most of the state of New Jersey, with the exception of its northeastern corner.

Assemblyman Jack Ciatrarelli also recently called for Christie to step down. “This endorsement concerns me in that it could mean he’ll be out of state a great deal again,” Ciattarelli told Politico. “If that’s the case, it’s time for him to really give consideration for what’s in the best interests of New Jersey and step down.”

Chris Christie has largely abandoned New Jersey — he spent 261 days partially or fully out of the state last year between campaigning for the Republican nomination and serving as the former head of the Republican Governor’s Association. Even before he was officially in the running for the Republican nomination, he was shoring up his out-of-state support.

The editorial calls for New Jersey residents to demand a recall election, where Christie would essentially be forced out by his constituents. According to the New Jersey Department of Elections, 25 percent of those who voted in the last election in the state would have to sign the petition to dump his ass.

The New Hampshire Union-Leader got national press in November when it endorsed Christie for president, which New Jersey Star-Ledger editorial page editor Tom Moran duly took them to task for. The Union-Leader has retracted its endorsement, telling the world that they were duped by his “Republican governor in a Democratic state” schtick:

“Watching Christie kiss the Donald’s ring this weekend — and make excuses for the man Christie himself had said was unfit for the presidency — demonstrated how wrong we were. Rather than standing up to the bully, Christie bent his knee. In doing so, he rejected the very principles of his campaign that attracted our support.

Moran himself has caught fire, first for writing a milquetoast “endorsement” of Christie’s reelection in 2013, which he then retracted a few months later after the Bridgegate scandal came to light. He was even bolder last year, when he detailed a list of lies the governor had told constituents. “He is a remarkable talent with a silver tongue,” he wrote, “but if you look closely, you can see that it is forked like a serpent’s.”

Photo: Republican presidential candidate and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie looks on at his primary election night party Nashua, New Hampshire, February 9, 2016. REUTERS/Gretchen Ertl