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Trump Issued Last-Minute Pardon To Pirro’s Ex-Husband

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

On almost every Saturday night for the past four years former judge, Jeanine Pirro, has used her Fox News show to praise and defend President Donald Trump, frequently in a screaming rant. Pirro is close friends with the soon-to-be former president, so it surprised some that her ex-husband's name was not on the list of 143 pardons and commutations Trump released overnight.

That list now stands at 144.

Albert Pirro, Trump's former real estate attorney, has just been granted a full pardon by President Donald Trump, literally with minutes remaining in his term.

Danziger Draws

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Trump Pardons Accused Fraudster Bannon During Final Hours In Office

President Donald Trump pardoned his former campaign strategist Steve Bannon on his last day in office, according to CNN, following a fierce internal debate over Bannon's fate that was ultimately decided in his favor.

Bannon faced charges brought by federal prosecutors in the Southern District of New York in an indictment released last August. Prosecutors allege that Bannon and three co-defendants defrauded thousands of donors to "We Build The Wall," a group raising money to construct a barrier along the southern border. The indictment charged that Bannon, Brian Kolfage, Andrew Badolato, and Timothy Shea siphoned at least a million dollars from the non-profit organization while claiming that the money went only to their construction project.

Attorneys and other Trump aides reportedly tried to discourage Trump from pardoning Bannon, but the president suddenly was keen to protect his former adviser, who has echoed Trump's lies about the presidential election. In fact Bannon has been among the most fanatical media promoters of unrest and even violence, as a leading voice in the "Stop the Steal" crusade that led to the sacking of the Capitol. That campaign apparently soothed Trump's fury at Bannon over disparaging public remarks about the president and his older children, especially Don Jr., whom he accused of "treasonous" behavior for secretly meeting with Kremlin agents during 2016.

If Bannon was auditioning for a pardon in recent weeks, his bloodthirsty pandering still gave pause to Trump's lawyers – who worried that the former adviser played a culpable role in the Capitol riot on January 6. For many weeks leading up to the assault on the Capitol, he broadcast strident calls to action, comparing the present political standoff to the bloody confrontations of the Revolutionary War and D-Day.

"All hell is going to break loose tomorrow," crowed Bannon on his January 5 "War Room" podcast, hours before erupting violence left five people dead, including a Capitol Police officer. "And all I can say is, strap in ... You have made this happen and tomorrow it's game day. So strap in. Let's get ready."

Until Tuesday evening, Trump aides and lawyers thought they had quashed the Bannon pardon. Evidently they were wrong.

Republican Lawmakers Seeking Pardons For Involvement In Capitol Riot

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

With President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration ceremony less than 24 hours away, reporters have been wondering to whom President Donald Trump will grant pardons during his remaining time in the White House. And according to CNN's sources, Trump has decided against granting them to GOP lawmakers who spoke at or helped put together his "Save America Rally" in Washington, D.C. on Jan. 6.

That rally took place before a violent mob of far-right extremists and Trump supporters stormed the Capitol building. The House of Representatives has since indicted Trump on an article of impeachment for "incitement to insurrection."In an article published by CNN's website the day before Biden's inauguration, reporters Kaitlan Collins, Kevin Liptak and Pamela Brown explain:

"Several Republican lawmakers who are alleged to have been involved in the rally that preceded the deadly riot on the U.S. Capitol have sought clemency from Trump before he leaves office. But after meeting with his legal advisers for several hours on Saturday, the president decided he would not grant them, according to two people familiar with his plans."

The CNN reporters add, "The fear of legal exposure is not limited to Republicans who promoted or spoke at the rally, including Reps. Andy Biggs, Mo Brooks and Paul Gosar. Those who participated, organized and fundraised for it are also concerned, sources told CNN, including his eldest son, Donald Trump, Jr., and his girlfriend, Kimberly Guilfoyle, who both spoke at the rally."

The report doesn't explicitly specify which Republican lawmakers sought out the pardons. But it's noteworthy that any feel pardons for their conduct would be necessary. Some Democrats have suggested that Republican members of Congress may have had even more insidious roles in the attack than organizing or speaking at the rally that helped fuel the attack; they have indicated that some Republicans may have even played a part in planning the invasion of the Capitol Building itself, though it's not clear what evidence for these claims exists.


Collins, Liptak, and Brown report that Trump allies associated with the GOP groups that promoted the "Save America Rally," which included Women for America First and Turning Point Action, "have also voiced private concern about legal repercussions, a person familiar tells CNN."

The New York Times' Maggie Haberman has reported that when Trump first found out that a mob had stormed the Capitol Building, he was "pleased" — as he believed that the rioters were fighting for him. But he grew concerned, according to Haberman's sources, when his allies told him he may have "legal exposure."

On Saturday, Collins, Liptak, and Brown report, White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and attorney Eric Herschmann — who represented Trump during his first impeachment — gave some "grave warnings" to Trump as well as his daughter, Ivanka Trump, and son-in-law Jared Kushner.

"Trump was warned the pardons he once hoped to bestow upon his family and even himself would place him in a legally perilous position, convey the appearance of guilt and potentially make him more vulnerable to reprisals," the CNN journalists explain. "So, too, was Trump warned that pardons for Republican lawmakers who had sought them for their role in the Capitol insurrection would anger the very Senate Republicans who will determine his fate in an upcoming impeachment trial."