The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton

Photo by Tony Plohetski/ Twitter

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton on Tuesday filed a lawsuit with the U.S. Supreme Court seeking to block four states in which Joe Biden beat Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential election from certifying their election results.

The suit, State of Texas v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, State of Georgia, State of Michigan, and State of Wisconsin, also asks the court to require those states to hold entirely new elections — a move to try to buy time for Trump to come up with a way to steal the 2020 election that he lost in a "landslide."


The lawsuit was filed on so-called safe harbor day, which is a deadline set by federal law for states to resolve election disputes and for Congress to count the electoral votes of states that have met the deadline before the Electoral College meets to formally vote on the winner of the presidential election six days later.

Legal experts say the lawsuit is destined to fail, with the Supreme Court unlikely to hear the challenge at all.

University of Texas School of Law professor Steve Vladeck tweeted, "It looks like we have a new leader in the 'craziest lawsuit filed to purportedly challenge the election' category. The State of Texas is suing Pennsylvania, Georgia, Michigan and Wisconsin *directly* in #SCOTUS. (Spoiler Alert: The Court is *never* going to hear this one.)"

"So chalk this up as mostly a stunt — a dangerous, offensive, and wasteful one, but a stunt nonetheless," he added.

Paxton's suit is the latest attempt by Republicans lawmakers across the country to stop the official count of the election won by President-elect Biden.

Like the other legal challenges that have failed one by one in both state and federal courts, Paxton's lawsuit relies on lies about voter fraud that Trump and his allies have provided no evidence for and that have been debunked.

And with the safe harbor deadline here, the window to overturn Trump's loss is likely closed.

Paxton has a history of questionable and allegedly fraudulent actions.

He was one of the parties in a lawsuit filed with the Supreme Court and recently heard that, if successful, would overturn the Affordable Care Act and deprive millions of Americans of health insurance in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic.

And Paxton has been under criminal indictment on charges of felony securities fraud since 2015. He is also currently under federal investigation for allegedly abusing the powers of his office to help a donor.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

President Joe Biden

The price of gasoline is not Joe Biden's fault, nor did it break records. Adjusted for inflation, it was higher in 2008 when Republican George W. Bush was president. And that wasn't Bush's fault, either.

We don't have to like today's inflation, but that problem, too, is not Biden's doing. Republicans are nonetheless hot to pin the rap on him. Rising prices, mostly tied to oil, have numerous causes. There would be greater supply of oil and gas, they say, if Biden were more open to approving pipelines and more drilling on public land.

Keep reading... Show less
Youtube Screenshot

Heat deaths in the U.S. peak in July and August, and as that period kicks off, a new report from Public Citizen highlights heat as a major workplace safety issue. With basically every year breaking heat records thanks to climate change, this is only going to get worse without significant action to protect workers from injury and death.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration admits that government data on heat-related injury, illness, and death on the job are “likely vast underestimates.” Those vast underestimates are “about 3,400 workplace heat-related injuries and illnesses requiring days away from work per year from 2011 to 2020” and an average of 40 fatalities a year. Looking deeper, Public Citizen found, “An analysis of more than 11 million workers’ compensation injury reports in California from 2001 through 2018 found that working on days with hotter temperatures likely caused about 20,000 injuries and illnesses per year in that state, alone—an extraordinary 300 times the annual number injuries and illnesses that California OSHA (Cal/OSHA) attributes to heat.”

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}