The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Trump's cabinet meets in the White House

In a private lunch with Republican senators on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, Donald Trump voiced his opposition to continuing the $600 weekly increase to unemployment insurance Congress passed to help workers who lost jobs thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Washington Post reported.

Trump is following the lead of Senate Republicans, who have been opposed to the payments since Congress first passed them in March. All but two GOP senators voted to strip the $600 weekly unemployment insurance boost from the $2 trillion coronavirus relief package, though their effort failed.


Republicans at the time said it's wrong to pay some workers more in unemployment benefits than they were receiving before the pandemic hit, claiming it would discourage Americans from seeking work.

"You can extend some assistance, but you don't want to pay people more unemployed than they'd make working. You should never make more than your actual wages," Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) — who led the unsuccessful effort to strip the unemployment insurance boost from the relief package — told the Post.

Graham also told the Post that Trump "agrees that that is hurting the economic recovery."

Rather than worrying about increased unemployment insurance, economists have expressed concern that stopping the increased payments would actually hurt the economic recovery. Currently, the increased payments are scheduled to expire at the end of July.

The Economic Policy Institute, a nonpartisan economic think-tank, is calling for continued support for unemployed Americans. "These provisions are very important and will help millions of people," it wrote in an April 7 blog post.

Ultimately, Trump urged Senate Republicans at the meeting not to rush to pass more coronavirus relief aid, despite the fact that more than 36 million Americans are out of work, with experts predicting that the unemployment rate could surpass Great Depression levels.

Congressional Republicans have been following that lead, with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy saying Tuesday that he doesn't "see the need" for more aid. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has also said he doesn't feel any "urgency" to pass more relief.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Dr. Mehmet Oz and Sean Hannity

Youtube Screenshot

Fox News prime-time host Sean Hannity is priming his audience to see election fraud in any defeat for Dr. Mehmet Oz, his favored candidate who currently leads the GOP primary for U.S. Senate in Pennsylvania with two percent of votes outstanding. If the fast-closing hedge funder Dave McCormick takes the lead and the Oz camp claims the election has been stolen, it could set up a potentially explosive proxy war with Hannity’s colleague Laura Ingraham, whose Fox program favors McCormick and has suggested he is likely to prevail when all the votes are counted.

The GOP primary was a chaotic slugfest that split Fox’s slate of pro-GOP hosts in an unusually public way. Hannity was Oz’s most prominent supporter, reportedly securing the support of former President Donald Trump and using his program to endorse the TV personality, give him a regular platform, and target the challenge from right-wing commentator and Fox & Friends regular Kathy Barnette. Ingraham, meanwhile, used her Fox program (which airs in the hour following Hannity’s) to promote McCormick, criticize Oz, and defend Barnette.

Keep reading... Show less
Youtube Screenshot

Overturning Roe v. Wade is very unpopular, yet another poll confirms. Nearly two out of three people, or 64 percent, told the NPR/PBS Newshour/Marist poll that Roe should not be overturned, including 62 percent of independents. The poll also includes some good news for Democrats.

According to the poll, the prospect of the Supreme Court striking down Roe in the most extreme way is motivating Democratic voters more than Republicans: Sixty-six percent of Democrats say it makes them more likely to vote in November compared with 40 percent of Republicans. That echoes a recent NBC poll finding a larger rise in enthusiasm about voting among Democrats than Republicans.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}