The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Former Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen Pence

Vice President Mike Pence's office has reportedly made an effort to cooperate with the January 6 House Select Committee as it continues its investigation into former President Donald Trump.

Per Axios, Pence's former chief of staff Marc Short, former press secretary Alyssa Farah, and former national security aide Keith Kellogg, are included on the list of individuals who have testified to share their accounts of what transpired.

According to an inside source, Short's decision to testimony reportedly came with approval from the former vice president. Inside sources have also revealed the most pertinent information has come from "second-and third-tier administration staff who were not directly involved but were at the White House on January 6 and had access to top administration officials."

The testimonies from Pence’s team have helped investigators "piece together" the series of events that occurred in the hours after the "Save America" rally at the White House. The Capitol was under attack for more than three hours on that day. As lawmakers feared for their lives while the angry mob of Trump supporters stormed the federal building, Trump was reportedly at the White House watching the day unfold on TV.

Speaking to Axios, Farah said, "From the two I was in, you could see how much information they already had. Those who are refusing to cooperate likely are doing so out of complete fealty to Donald Trump and not wanting to piss him off."

"But, secondarily, because they're realizing the committee has quite a bit more information than they realized," Farah added. "And their involvement is known to a much greater degree than they realized."

The committee is hoping to "tell the full story of Trump's actions, interactions and refusals to act during a 187-minute timeframe between calling his allies to march to the Capitol and telling them to go home."

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

President Joe Biden

The price of gasoline is not Joe Biden's fault, nor did it break records. Adjusted for inflation, it was higher in 2008 when Republican George W. Bush was president. And that wasn't Bush's fault, either.

We don't have to like today's inflation, but that problem, too, is not Biden's doing. Republicans are nonetheless hot to pin the rap on him. Rising prices, mostly tied to oil, have numerous causes. There would be greater supply of oil and gas, they say, if Biden were more open to approving pipelines and more drilling on public land.

Keep reading... Show less
Youtube Screenshot

Heat deaths in the U.S. peak in July and August, and as that period kicks off, a new report from Public Citizen highlights heat as a major workplace safety issue. With basically every year breaking heat records thanks to climate change, this is only going to get worse without significant action to protect workers from injury and death.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration admits that government data on heat-related injury, illness, and death on the job are “likely vast underestimates.” Those vast underestimates are “about 3,400 workplace heat-related injuries and illnesses requiring days away from work per year from 2011 to 2020” and an average of 40 fatalities a year. Looking deeper, Public Citizen found, “An analysis of more than 11 million workers’ compensation injury reports in California from 2001 through 2018 found that working on days with hotter temperatures likely caused about 20,000 injuries and illnesses per year in that state, alone—an extraordinary 300 times the annual number injuries and illnesses that California OSHA (Cal/OSHA) attributes to heat.”

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}