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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

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Reprinted with permission from Alternet

President Donald Trump may be leaving the White House in the very near future, but it does not look like he will be going away, as promised, anytime soon.

The lame duck president is already strategizing for a 2024 presidential run to regain control of the White House, according to The Daily Beast. The publication reports that insiders close to the situation have revealed details about the president's latest plot.


It appears Trump has no intention of moving on from the presidential election defeat. While most former presidents move on with their lives after leaving the White House, insiders suggest Trump is ultimately trying to stay in the spotlight. The president's assessment is reportedly based on television ratings as opposed to actual professional experience and the ability to effectively govern the country.

In fact, things may get far worse before they get better as the embattled outgoing president looks to maintain control of the Republican Party and make President-elect Joe Biden's first term miserable. In fact, he has not only discussed another presidential run but is also planning for another campaign launch in the very near future.

Two knowledgeable inside sources have also revealed Trump is going a step further, mulling over the possibility of holding a 2024 campaign-related event the week of Biden's inauguration if his post-election legal battle ultimately falls flat.

Trump and his campaign advisors are reportedly already seeking out major donors for his next presidential run. Although some donors are not pleased with the president's antics, and one has even filed a lawsuit against the Trump campaign demanding they return his post-election contribution, surprisingly, there are still many donors willing to contribute to a new Trump run. In fact, some still believe the delusion that he still has a chance of a consecutive second term.

"I one hundred percent believe Donald Trump will win this election in the end," said Mike Lindell, the MyPillow CEO and Minnesota co-chair for Trump 2020. "But any day that we can have President Trump as our president is a blessing. So if that would happen, yes, I would fully support any opportunity for him to serve the American people for as many terms as possible."

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