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Tucker Carlson

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Tucker Carlson's first-grade teacher is speaking out against the scathing remarks he made about his time in her class. Speaking to The Washington Post, 77-year-old Marianna Raymond pushed back against her former student's assessment of her.

In his 2018 memoir titled, Ship of Fools: How a Selfish Ruling Class Is Bringing America to the Brink of Revolution, Carlson recalled his time at the prestigious La Jolla Country Day School and how he grew to detest his first-grade teacher. According to The Washington Post, Carlson "caricatured her [Raymond] as 'a parody of earth-mother liberalism' who 'wore long Indian-print skirts. . . . She had little interest in conventional academic topics, like reading and penmanship.'"

The publication also highlighted the excerpt from his book where he "recalled her sobbing theatrically at her desk, saying, 'The world is so unfair! You don't know that yet. But you'll find out!'"

Carlson claimed educators should "stop blubbering and teach us to read. . . . Mrs. Raymond never did teach us; my father had to hire a tutor to get me through phonics."

However, in comments to the Post, Raymond argues otherwise. She insists Carlson's assessment is highly "embellished." Speaking briefly to the paper, Raymond said, "That is the most embellished, crazy thing I ever heard." The former teacher also admitted that she found Carlson's claim relatively shocking because he remembered him as being "very precious and very, very polite and sweet."

Raymond said she was completely unaware of her former student's claims until she was contacted for comment by the publication.

Per The Washington Post:

"Raymond said in an interview that she never sobbed at her desk, didn't wear an Indian skirt, and didn't advocate her political views. She said that not only did she teach Carlson reading at La Jolla Country Day School — with a student body that was "very affluent and White" — but that she also was then hired to tutor him at his home."

In wake of the latest developments, the Fox News network has also spoken out. As expected, the network is continuing to stand by Carlson.

In a brief statement to the Post, a representative defended the primetime host saying, "Tucker Carlson is an important voice in America which deeply resonates with millions of viewers via our powerful primetime lineup and two in-depth shows on FOX Nation – we fully support him."

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