The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Tucker Carlson

Photo by Gage Skidmore is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, called on Friday morning for the firing of Fox News host Tucker Carlson, after Carlson embraced the white nationalist "replacement" conspiracy theory on Thursday night.

"Now, I know that the left and all the little gatekeepers on Twitter become literally hysterical if you use the term 'replacement,' if you suggest that the Democratic Party is trying to replace the current electorate, the voters now casting ballots, with new people, more obedient voters from the Third World," Carlson said during an appearance on Fox News Primetime. "But they become hysterical because that's what's happening actually. Let's just say it: That's true."

The so-called "great replacement" theory posits that white people are being systematically "replaced" by people of color through mass immigration. The Guardian explained that under this theory, "replacement has been orchestrated by a shadowy group as part of their grand plan to rule the world … . This group is often overtly identified as being Jews, but sometimes the antisemitism is more implicit."

The theory has also been linked to far-right terrorists who committed mass shootings in both New Zealand and El Paso, Texas, in 2019. The white nationalist groups who marched in 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia, were also heard chantingboth "You will not replace us" and the variant "Jews will not replace us."

In addition, Fox News personalities (including Carlson) have promoted the conspiracy theory for years, casting immigration as a "purposeful repopulation of America" and helping to propel the idea further into the mainstream of public discourse.

Carlson's own escalated rhetoric Thursday night also appeared to tap directly into the calls for direct action that motivated previous attackers. In a twisted logical pirouette, he declared that his opposition to immigration was a "voting rights" issue on the grounds that any new citizens in the country would mean "every time they import a new voter, I become disenfranchised as a current voter." (Meanwhile, he has also supported conspiracy theories about the 2020 election and the new wave of restrictions on voting rights.)

"Why should I sit back and take that?" he said. "The power that I have as an American guaranteed at birth is one man, one vote, and they are diluting it. No, they are not allowed to do it. Why are we putting up with this?"

From Your Site Articles
Related Articles Around the Web

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Rep. Ted Budd, left, and Cheri Beasley

On Tuesday, North Carolina Republicans selected Rep. Ted Budd (R-NC), a far-right extremist who has pushed false claims about the 2020 election, to be their Senate nominee. He will face Democratic nominee Cheri Beasley, a former chief justice of the state's Supreme Court.

As of Wednesday morning, Budd had received more than 58 percent of the GOP primary vote. Former Gov. Pat McCrory received just below 25 percent of the vote, while former Rep. Mark Walker received about nine percent of the vote.

Keep reading... Show less

Stephen Colbert

It seems we can't go even a week in America without some deranged white nationalist shooter taking the lives of decent people. Of course, this type of violence is propagated on a daily basis by the far-right sh*tweasals at Fox News and, worse yet, in the ranks of the Republican Party.

After returning to the Late Show helm, Stephen Colbert weighed in on the real culprit behind the mass shootings -- the Replacement Theory popularized by Tucker Carlson.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}