The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene

Reprinted with permission from American Independent

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) on Wednesday said that she did not believe that the riot by supporters of Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol on January 6 was an insurrection.

Greene made her remarks during a town hall meeting in Rockmart, Georgia, explaining why she voted against a House resolution honoring the Capitol Police who responded to the attack.

"The language in that bill, number one, declared every single person at the Capitol there that day on January 6 an 'insurrectionist,'" said Greene. "And I do not believe that that was insurrection. I'm not going to label people that way, OK?"

Five people died as a result of the rioting, which occurred after a "Stop the Steal" rally headlined by Donald Trump at which he falsely claimed that he had won the 2020 presidential election.

Before the attack, Greene made similarly untrue allegations and attended other "Stop the Steal" rallies in the days following Trump's election loss.

On November 6, 2020, Greene tweeted, "The time to STAND UP for @realDonaldTrump is RIGHT NOW! Republicans can't back down. This loser mindset is how the Democrats win. President Trump has fought for us, we have to fight for him. We won't forget."

From a May 5 town hall meeting:

MARJORIE TAYLOR GREENE: So they awarded the Capitol Police, recently, for their work on January 6. I tell you, I couldn't vote for it and I'll tell you why, and I had a hard time with not voting for it, but here's why.
The language in that bill, number one, declared every single person at the Capitol there that day on Januiary 6 an "insurrectionist." And I do not believe that that was insurrection. I'm not going to label people that way, OK?
There have been riots and acts of terror all year long in American cities and we need to address — if we're going to address issues, we need to address all the issues.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Police outside Tops Friendly Market in Buffalo, New York, on May 14, 2022

By Steve Gorman and Moira Warburton

(Reuters) -An 18-year-old white gunman shot 10 people to death and wounded three others at a grocery store in a Black neighborhood of Buffalo, New York, before surrendering to authorities, who called it a hate crime and an act of "racially motivated violent extremism."

Keep reading... Show less

Supreme Court

Youtube Screenshot

The right-wing freakout over peaceful protests outside the homes of Supreme Court justices and chalk on the sidewalk in front of Republican senators’ homes, built around the seeming belief that any kind of protest at all is an act of violence, is actually a piece of classic right-wing projection. Conservatives assume that all protests feature intimidation and menace, bellicose threats, and acts of violence, because they themselves know no other way of protesting, as we’ve seen over the past five years and longer—especially on Jan. 6.

So it’s not surprising that the right-wing response to protests over the imminent demise of the Roe v. Wade ruling so far is riddled with white nationalist thugs turning up in the streets, and threats directed at Democratic judges. Ben Makuch at Vice reported this week on how far-right extremists are filling Telegram channels with calls for the assassination of federal judges, accompanied by doxxing information revealing their home addresses.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}