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Why Colin Powell’s Death Shouldn’t Promote Vaccine Hesitancy

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell has died after contracting COVID-19. In covering his passing, The Associated Press wrote that he was fully vaccinated but has not yet included his diagnosis of multiple myeloma, a type of blood cancer that hurts the ability of a body to respond to infections.

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MyPillow Conspiracy Guy Pulls Ads From Fox News

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

MyPillow CEO and conspiracy theorist Mike Lindell is reportedly pulling his company's ads from Fox News after the network allegedly rejected an advertisement for his cyber symposium scheduled for mid-August. As The Wall Street Journal reported, Lindell "has said the symposium will prove the 2020 election was stolen from then-President Donald Trump through manipulation of election machines."

MyPillow is Fox News' single largest advertiser, after other companies have dropped ads over the years due to the network's bigotry and conspiracy theories.

Media Matters President Angelo Carusone laid out the details, including that MyPillow accounted for 18 percent of all ads on Fox News' Tucker Carlson Tonight in the first half of 2021. In 2020, there were periods when MyPillow accounted for 41 percent of that show's ad inventory.

As Carusone noted, the situation on Fox News prime time is so dire that Fox Corporation, the channel's parent company, is one of the largest paid advertisers. And now that situation goes from bad to worse, with MyPillow apparently dropping out.

(Also, for the record: MyPillow is not the only Fox News prime-time advertiser steeped in controversy. The Federal Trade Commission has charged that Balance of Nature, another top advertiser on Fox, made bogus claims that its products could ward off the coronavirus. As Media Matters has reported, such ads featured prominent right-wing media personalities, including current California gubernatorial candidate Larry Elder.)

Fox Welcomed Lindell's Deranged Conspiracy Theories — Until Now

As Media Matters and others have documented since his rise to prominence in right-wing circles during the Trump years, Lindell is a major backer of extremist conspiracy theories, ranging from calling COVID-19 vaccines the "mark of the beast" to claiming that Trump won the 2020 presidential election in a landslide (including in California).

Lindell is now trying to "prove" that the election was stolen from Trump by hosting what he calls a "cyber symposium" in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in mid-August. He's been lashing out at Fox News recently for not promoting the event, telling Salon's Zachary Petrizzo a week ago that he was going to force the issue by placing ads on the network.

One such ad that Petrizzo highlights:

Lindell Ad, Fox News - SALON.COM www.youtube.com

Ironically, Lindell has been welcome on Fox News until recently. Even after Tucker Carlson derided Sidney Powell's "Kraken" conspiracy theories about the election (and even after the January 6 attack), the Fox host still welcomed Lindell on his show to push the very same conspiracy theories.

As my colleague Matt Gertz wrote in February:

Since Lindell lost access to Twitter, Fox, Newsmax, and OAN have all eagerly provided him with access to their audiences. Fox star Tucker Carlson hosted him on the evening of his banning, giving the MyPillow CEO a sympathetic platform to push his Dominion conspiracy theories. In fact, Carlson, whose show's commercial blocks are a barren wasteland overwhelmingly reliant on the pillow company's advertisements, has repeatedly given Lindell pathetically sycophantic treatment.

Right-wing media have certainly welcomed the pillowman's money, and many of them are apparently still going to do the same when it comes to this ad. Just look anywhere and you'll see the sycophantic treatment, from Steve Bannon to Infowars to One America News Network to Newsmax to many others. But it's Fox News that has given Lindell his biggest perch -- and now it is reaping what it has sowed.

Fox news can't get enough of pillow czar Mike Lindell www.youtube.com

Hannity Denies Adopting Sane Stance On Vaccination — And He’s Right

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

On July 21, Sean Hannity went on a long radio rant denying that he ever recommended his viewers get the vaccine. He later repeated himself on his Fox show.

This endorsement of vaccine hesitancy messaging from Hannity came after days of positive mainstream press for the Fox News host. Following a viral out-of-context tweet, reports in places like Politico Playbook, The Atlantic, The New York Times, NPR, and The Week framed pieces around Hannity supposedly endorsing the vaccines, even though he never did any such thing. The funniest version of this was the Fox News version, which was never shared to any of its social accounts, per Crowdtangle. (The former Republican governor of North Carolina, Pat McCrory, shared the piece and lauded Hannity, writing, "Thank you, Sean Hannity. Vaccines work and they will save lives.")

CNN host Alisyn Camerota, Hannity's former colleague at Fox, waxed poetically on multiple occasions about Hannity endorsing vaccines. Other outlets, like The Washington Post, Vox, and The Associated Press, correctly noted that Hannity's acknowledgment of vaccine science was immediately preceded and followed by anti-vaccine segments. (Longtime Hannity watchers know what a real change of position from him looks like.)

If this media cycle sounds familiar, it's because mainstream outlets had the exact same "new tone" problem with Trump, suggesting over and over, incorrectly, that he was changing his approach. Now the cliche is deployed for Trump's henchman, to the same results.

Interestingly, Hannity's anti-vax radio remarks came in response to anti-vax criticism of Hannity from the generic right-wing content mill of radio host Wayne Dupree, a Sandy Hook truther who has falsely claimed that the parents of a Sandy Hook victim were "actors" and the shooting was a "hoax."

So, not only does Hannity distance himself from the vaccines, but he's doing so to appease a far-right conspiracy theorist who has written about crisis actors. Why is Hannity acting like this? Because he's scared.

Recall that Hannity is the comparatively responsible one about vaccines on Fox News prime-time shows. And the Murdoch/vaccine problem isn't even limited to North America!

Next time, don't listen to Fox News' PR spin. Just listen to what Fox hosts say.

From Hannity's radio show:

SEAN HANNITY (HOST): For some reason, me saying take COVID seriously has finally caught up with the mob and the -- and the media. Now, I think they've got ulterior motives. They monitor this show and TV every night, and I think it has to do with the fact that -- you know, there's been this attempt to blame conservatives for the vaccine hesitancy.

And, you know for example, Yahoo News: "Suddenly Sean Hannity and other Fox hosts are urging their viewers to get COVID-19 vaccines." Suddenly? Well, first of all, I'm not urging people to get the COVID-19 vaccine, because I'm not a doctor. That is not what I said. I said to take it seriously, it can kill you. I said to do a lot of research. If you have a phone, do your research. I said to consult your doctor and doctors, and medical professionals you trust. I said to consider your unique medical history that I know nothing about. I said to also look at your current medical condition and, in consultation with your doctors, take -- don't not do this. Do the research.

...

You know, Biden suggesting that people like me had an altar call on vaccines -- no, I haven't.

...

"Sean Hannity basically begs his viewers to get vaccinated." No, I didn't. I'm begging everybody, don't mess around with this thing. Take it seriously.

...

It would be wrong of me, not knowing your medical condition, to tell you what to do. It's not right.

...

Now, we do have therapeutics. I mean, they could be saying, "Wow, studies show that people like Hannity were right on hydroxychloroquine and ivermectin and therapeutics like Regeneron," but we're never going to hear that either.

...

I am encouraging people to really, really do the right thing for them, because I don't know. And yes, enough people have died, and yeah, I want you to take it seriously, and no, I don't apologize -- and I was being pressured heavily early on to tell people what to do. I'm not qualified to tell you what to do, I'm not. I bring on doctors and experts, some of whom I agree with or disagree with so you can have more information at your disposal.
"Hannity's pro vaccine speech is welcome" -- I mean, what -- why are they saying something I didn't say? I said I believe in the science, I believe in the science of vaccinations, and then I said, but I can't make these decisions for anybody. "Hannity urges viewers, get COVID vaccine." I never said that. I said, if it's right for you, after you do all of your research, after you talk to your doctor, doctors, medical professionals you trust, I said, after -- you really need to take it seriously, and then make the decision that is best for you. So, these headlines are wrong.

...

By the way, whatever happened -- what's wrong with Wayne Dupree? I thought Wayne Dupree was a friend of ours, Lynda. Right?

LYNDA MCLAUGHLIN (PRODUCER): Yeah, started out as a caller on the show.

HANNITY: "Sean Hannity is skating on very thin ice with his supporters. Did he finally cross the line?" and he does this whole bit -- and then I'm reading it, and sweet baby James prints this out, and goes "you need to see this," because -- you know Wayne Dupree. We -- we always liked Wayne Dupree, we've never had a problem with Wayne Dupree. He's a good guy, but then he's saying, "He's very passionate about people taking the vaccine, and he's pushing it a lot on his show."

Hey Wayne, if you're gonna say something about me, get it right. I said -- let me -- let me say it slowly, so everybody hears me -- this thing has killed enough people. Take it seriously. Everybody knows about masks and social distancing and that there are three vaccines available. Everybody knows. I can't make the decision for you. But --
MCLAUGHLIN: Actually, Sean, let's do one better. Let's play what we have. I think it deserves to be played at this point.

HANNITY: By the way, should I dedicate it to our old friend, apparently, Wayne Dupree, who I've always liked?
MCLAUGHLIN: Well, let's give him the benefit of the doubt and say maybe he didn't hear it. So, Wyane we hope you are listening, and maybe you understand what's really going on here and stop listening to fake news.

...

HANNITY: Wayne Dupree, I'll accept your apology.

From Hannity's Fox News show:

SEAN HANNITY (HOST): Now a brief message from me to the mob in the media.

I have no idea why, but it was only in the last week my coverage of coronavirus, COVID-19 got the attention of the liberal press, and their attempts to paint this great network of ours which has varying opinions, which is actually fair and balanced, to paint us as a dangerous anti-vaccine network.

They watched this program and were shocked to discover what I said and what I had been saying for months, and months and months.

Business Insider reports, quote, "Suddenly, Sean Hannity and other Fox hosts are urging their viewers to get COVID-19 vaccines." Here's another headline, "Sean Hannity basically begs his viewers to get vaccinated." Another quote, "'The View': Sunny Hostin calls Hannity's vaccination endorsement 'Too little, too late.'"

These reports are all false for multiple reasons. First, I touted Operation Warp Speed since the beginning. In January 2020 I was predicting that I had so much faith in American researchers, the medical community, scientists and, as usual, it was my prediction that it would likely be American ingenuity and genius that will help us find therapeutics and vaccines and answers. And I praised the efforts of all of the scientists and medical professionals. Those involved in developing therapeutics, there are three vaccines that are now on the market, and literally dozens of others, in terms of therapeutics.

But I have never told anyone to get a vaccine. I have been very clear. I am simply not qualified. I am not a medical doctor. I know nothing about your medical history or your current medical condition. I think it's inappropriate for me to do so. Instead, for over a year now I have been warning my viewers, you make my career possible

Language has been updated for clarity.

Fox News Is Using An Internal ‘Vaccine Passport’ System

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

If you watch Fox News coverage of the vaccine rollout over the last six months, there is one thing you know for certain: Fox hosts and personalities do not want businesses to require proof of vaccination, colloquially known as vaccine passports.

But now we have learned that Fox itself requires a vaccine passport, called a "Fox Clear Pass." Ryan Grim reported it on Monday morning, and Oliver Darcy further reported:

Fox employees, including those who work at Fox News, received an email, obtained by CNN Business, from the company's Human Resources department in early June that said Fox had "developed a secure, voluntary way for employees to self-attest their vaccination status."

The system allows for employees to self-report to Fox the dates their shots were administered and which vaccines were used.

The company has encouraged employees to report their status, telling them that "providing this information to FOX will assist the company with space planning and contact tracing."

Employees who report their status are allowed to bypass the otherwise required daily health screening, according to a follow-up email those who reported their vaccination status received.

"Thank you for providing FOX with your vaccination information," the email said. "You no longer are required to complete your daily health screening through WorkCare/WorkMatters."

The concept, which was first reported Monday by Ryan Grim on The Hill's morning streaming show, is known internally as "FOX Clear Pass."

While the "Fox Clear Pass" is voluntary for employees, and other companies have similar tools, it is still remarkable, given how vocal Fox's top talent has been in criticizing the concept of vaccine passports.

To say that condemnations of vaccine requirements have been ubiquitous on Fox News is an understatement. One Fox host likened such requirements to communist East Germany. Tucker Carlson called the requirements "medical Jim Crow" and agreed with Turning Point USA's Charlie Kirk that they are like apartheid. Laura Ingraham said requirements would usher in a "brave new world." Just this morning, Florida's attorney general said on Fox Business that vaccine requirements would lead to a "segregated society."

Now we know the deep hypocrisy behind the Fox-GOP feedback loop on vaccine requirements, but don't expect them to stop.

Research contributions from John Kerr.

On Fox News, Kayleigh McEnany Still Tells Absurd Lies

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

Fox's Kayleigh McEnany, a liar who served as White House press secretary under former President Donald Trump, lied about slavery and the founders of the United States during Tuesday's Outnumbered.

Introducing a segment, McEnany claimed that "all of our main Founding Fathers were against slavery, recognized the evils of it."

KAYLEIGH MCENANY (CO-HOST): The haters never take a day off from hating, that is clear. And they never take a day off from getting the facts wrong. We know most of our forefathers, all of our main Founding Fathers were against slavery, recognized the evils of it.

This is flatly untrue.

The majority of signers of the Declaration of Independence owned slaves -- 41 of 56, according to one study.

Just look at some of the early presidents. George Washington enslaved hundreds of men, women, and children. Thomas Jefferson enslaved over 600 people, including Sally Hemings. James Madison enslaved over 100 people, James Monroe as many as 250. We could go on.

Banned From Facebook, 'Former Guy' Will Return Via Lara Trump’s Pages

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

Fox News contributor Lara Trump announced on Instagram today that she will interview her father-in-law, former President Donald Trump, for her show The Right View.

The Right View began as a Trump campaign product, but it has continued in recent weeks with videos that have been uploaded to Lara Trump's Facebook page, YouTube, and a Rumble page with her name. (The Rumble videos are embedded on the show's own website, where these social media accounts are linked from.)

Former President Trump is still suspended from Facebook after inciting the January 6 attack on the Capitol building, while the platform's Oversight Board contemplates recommending letting him back on the platform.

A thorough Media Matters review of over 6,000 of Trump's Facebook posts found that more than a quarter of them contained COVID-19 misinformation, election lies, or extreme rhetoric about Trump critics. The former president has continued spreading these lies in recent interviews.

Facebook's refusal to draw clear lines in enforcing its own policies is at the core of this mess -- it's no coincidence that Lara Trump broke the news on Facebook-owned Instagram.

What You Can Do To Clean Up Tucker Carlson’s Fascist Barf

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

On Sunday's Last Week Tonight, host John Oliver documented at length the white identity politics of Fox News host Tucker Carlson. Watch:

Tucker Carlson: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO) www.youtube.com


Media Matters has documented Carlson's white nationalism at length. Additionally, as noted by Oliver, Media Matters has previously published tapes of Carlson spewing racism and misogyny on Bubba the Love Sponge's radio show.

But in addition to what Oliver highlighted, there are some steps that people can take today to help hold Carlson accountable -- and the third is the most important of all.

Contact Tucker Carlson's advertisers.

You can see Tucker Carlson's leading advertisers and their contact information here.

There are advertisers that sponsor Carlson's white nationalism. We've listed them here, along with their contact information.

But the truth of the matter is that over the years, Carlson has lost many of his blue-chip advertisers. For instance: Last summer, he lost numerous major advertisers after his bigoted rants about Black Lives Matter.

What's left is mostly die-hards and ideological supporters, led by MyPillow. MyPillow's CEO is far-right conspiracy theorist Mike Lindell, who appeared on Carlson's show recently to pitch debunked conspiracy theories about Dominion Voting Systems and the 2020 election. The appearance was eventually mentioned in Dominion's lawsuit against Lindell.

There are still companies that should be contacted and pressured about their support for Carlson's show, like the pharmaceutical companies that are underwriting Carlson's attacks on COVID-19 vaccines.

Contact Fox News' advertisers.

You can see Fox News' leading advertisers and contact information for them here.

Of late, Carlson has shown up all over the rest of Fox News; in essence, he has become the network's assignment editor, with its so-called "straight news" programs running dozens of segments jumping off his commentary. (This approach ramped up after Newsmax made ratings gains against Fox shortly after the election by aggressively challenging Fox's acknowledgment that Joe Biden won the presidential election.) Fox's streaming app, Fox Nation, is also promising additional Tucker Carlson content. Really, an entire wing of Fox Corp. is being centered around Carlson's bigotry and conspiracy theories.

Even before all of that happened, the network's essence was conspiracy theories, bigotry, and propaganda. It's just intensified since the election, with Carlson at the core.

And unlike his show, which has lost blue-chip advertisers, the overall network still has big-name advertisers -- which claim to hold values diametrically opposed to Carlson's.

But the sad truth is that even if Fox News lost all its advertisers, it would still remain profitable.

Sign up for the #UnFoxMyCableBox effort.

Join the #UnFoxMyCableBox effort here.

If you really want to know who funds Tucker Carlson's bigotry, the truth is that it's people like you and me. When you pay your cable bill, a portion goes to the various channels that you receive. Fox News received roughly $20 per year apiece from most cable news subscribers, regardless of whether they actually watch the channel. That's way more than its competitors CNN and MSNBC.

This unfair advantage means Fox News would be wildly profitable even if every single advertiser pulled its ads.

But we're at a key leverage point: Many of these agreements with cable companies are expiring and being renegotiated. The more people who join together to say that they don't want their money going to Fox News, the more leverage cable companies will have to rebuff Fox's demands. That's why we started the #UnFoxMyCableBox effort -- to build a coalition of people who can speak up about being forced to fund hate like Carlson's.

Trump Lawyer DiGenova Calls For Execution Of DHS Whistleblower

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

Trump lawyer Joe diGenova yestreday called for the execution of DHS whistleblower Chris Krebs, who was the director of the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) until he was fired by tweet by President Donald Trump for debunking conspiracy theories about the results of the 2020 elections.

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Even Fox News Skipped Giuliani’s Deranged Arizona ‘Hearing’ — Until Trump Tweeted

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

On Monday, Rudy Giuliani and others from the Trump campaign appeared in a public meeting with members of the Arizona state legislature to contest the state's election results. The meeting predictably featured plenty of deranged and debunked conspiracy theories about the election from the Trump campaign:

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Shoddy Reporting In Murdoch’s Hit Piece On Biden Exposed By New York Times

Katie Robertson has a must-read piece up at The New York Times about the reaction inside the New York Post's newsroom to its shoddy hit piece on Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his son Hunter earlier this week. Here are some of the key takeaways:

  • The report was mostly written by a staff writer who refused to put their name on it, per two Post sources.
  • Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani says he gave the material to the Post because he was worried other outlets would practice actual journalism: "either nobody else would take it, or if they took it, they would spend all the time they could to try to contradict it before they put it out."
  • Top figures at the paper were involved in deciding how to proceed, including editor in chief Stephen Lynch, digital editor in chief Michelle Gotthelf, and adviser Colin Allan.
  • Editors at the Post pressed people there to add their name to the byline, according to two sources who spoke to Robertson.
  • Of the two bylines on the piece, we had known that Emma-Jo Morris had worked at Sean Hannity's Fox News show recently, and that her Instagram had pictures of her with figures like Hannity, Roger Stone, and Steve Bannon. Robertson adds that Gabrielle Fonrouge, who had the other byline on the piece, did not know that she had a byline until after the piece went live. Robertson writes that three sources told her that Fonrouge "had little to do with the reporting or writing of the article."

The one outlet that embraced the report wholeheartedly from the get go was Fox News, which ran over 100 segments on the story in the first two and a half days, despite all the red flags.

The New York Post is the corporate cousin of Fox News, and is part of News Corp, which is run by executive chairman Rupert Murdoch, co-chairman Lachlan Murdoch, and CEO Robert Thomson. This is how Murdoch-style journalism works.

Update: Peter Sterne at New York magazine adds more, including a number of colorful quotes of Post employees who questioned the piece:

"I think it was very flimsy," one Post reporter told Intelligencer.
Another journalist at the paper was even more blunt.
"It's not something that meets my journalistic standards," they said, adding that the piece "should not have been published."
...
"It just makes you cringe and roll your eyes, and it's hard to stomach, but at the same time we kind of know that you're signing up for stuff like that," one Post reporter said. "It's upsetting. It's disappointing. It sucks to, like, work for, like, a propaganda outlet."

Fox Hosts Excuse Trump’s Admitted Lies About Pandemic Threat

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

For his new book, Bob Woodward taped conversations with President Donald Trump earlier this year. In some of the tapes, Trump admits that he knew the novel coronavirus was deadly even while he was downplaying it in public. Despite the damning revelation, Fox personalities immediately defended Trump.

In newly released audio excerpts from Woodward's interviews with Trump, the president said on a February 7 recording: "You just breathe the air and that's how it's passed. And so that's a very tricky one. That's a very delicate one. It's also more deadly than even your strenuous flu." In another conversation, Trump admitted that he was downplaying the risk of the virus, saying, "To be honest with you, I wanted to always play it down."

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Trump Campaign Video Features Conspiracy Theorist Who Backs QAnon, Doubts Coronavirus

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters


On July 5, the Trump campaign's Real News Insights featured Lara Trump interviewing Fox Nation host Isaiah Washington.

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Fox News Pushes Trump’s ‘Cognitive Test’ Taunt At Biden Presser

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

At the very end of former Vice President Joe Biden's press conference largely focusing on the Trump administration's botched response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Fox News reporter Doug McKelway pressed Biden about being tested for his mental capacity -- a constant theme of Fox News and the Trump campaign since Biden became the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee.

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Now Lachlan Murdoch Pretends His Racist Network Is ‘Woke’

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

Around 2:30 p.m. on June 2, The New York Times' Ben Smith tweeted a note from Fox Corp. Chief Executive Officer Lachlan Murdoch:

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In Rare Interview, ABC’s Muir Failed To Hold Trump Accountable

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters.

When you are a mainstream journalist and you have a rare one-on-one sit-down interview with President Donald Trump during a pandemic that has killed 70,000 people in this country alone, you need to do better than David Muir did.

It's not Muir's fault that Trump almost never does a one-on-one sit-down interview with the mainstream media. If you look through Trump's televised interviews, there's a lot with Fox News, a good helping of Sinclair, and the occasional quick local hit. The national mainstream journalist interviews are rare; the last ones were in June of 2019 with George Stephanopoulos (ABC), José Díaz-Balart (Telemundo), and Chuck Todd (NBC).

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Trump Disputes Ominous Death Projections With Fox News Talking Points

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

In an interview with ABC anchor David Muir, President Donald Trump repeated Fox News talking points about coronavirus models. This was his first broadcast network television interview since he spoke to NBC's Chuck Todd in June 2019.

Fox News personalities have been using the wide array of COVID-19 models and projections to cast doubt on all modeling predicting the number of coronavirus-related cases and deaths. In response to rising projections of COVID-19 deaths in the country -- and seizing on confusion about the number of the models, what they mean, and which ones are used by whom -- Fox figures are downplaying the accuracy of models in general, calling them "a bit of a crapshoot," and dismissing their predictions since "we don't factor in human ingenuity."

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Fox Business Puts Trish Regan On Hiatus After Coronavirus Rant

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters.

On Monday, March 9, Trish Regan opened her Fox Business show by complaining about the “Coronavirus impeachment scam.” Her deranged monologue received widespread ridicule after a tweet by Media Matters’ Andrew Lawrence that has been viewed millions of times.

On Friday, March 13, Bloomberg News reported that Regan’s 8 p.m. show, Trish Regan Primetime, was being put on hiatus.

“Fox Business’s prime-time programs Trish Regan Primetime and Kennedy will both be on hiatus until further notice,” Fox said in a statement. “Due to the demands of the evolving pandemic crisis coverage, we are deploying all resources from both shows for staffing needs during critical market hours. Fox Business will run long form programming in prime time for the foreseeable future.”

Regan acknowledged the move:

Fox Business’s Kennedy, hosted by Lisa “Kennedy” Montgomery, was also put on hiatus.

Before this monologue calling a deadly global pandemic a “scam,” Regan was known for over-the-top pro-Trump rhetoric and for being the first interview that top Trump adviser Stephen Miller gave after his emails revealed an affinity for racist rhetoric and white nationalist conspiracy theories.

Lest anyone get the wrong idea here, there is plenty of awful coronavirus coverage on Fox that has not led to any consequences.