The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Rudy Giuliani

Photo by Ennoti.com

Dominion Voting Systems is not letting the far-right conspirators who trashed their voting systems to create distrust in American democracy system get away with their lies. Just weeks after handing former Trump campaign lawyer Sidney Powell a defamation lawsuit, Dominion is now issuing a similar challenge to Rudy Giuliani, according to The Washington Post.

Filed in a U.S. District Court in Washington D.C.on Monday, the Dominion action is seeking more than $1.3 billion in damages from the former New York City mayor, who has continuously peddled false election information in an attempt to overturn a free and fair election that Donald Trump lost to President Joe Biden.

The court filing notes that "[Giuliani] was unwilling to make false election fraud claims about Dominion and its voting machines in a court of law because he knew those allegations are false...He and his allies manufactured and disseminated the 'Big Lie,' which foreseeably went viral and deceived millions of people into believing that Dominion had stolen their votes and fixed the election."

As former President Trump's personal attorney, Giuliani has repeatably uttered unfounded and often fantastic attacks against the voting systems company -- including claiming that Dominion is a "Venezuelan company," that used its software to help deceased Venezuelan president, Hugo Chávez, fix American elections, according to the Post. It is a claim with no basis in fact.

Dominion issued a warning to the Trump campaign and its staunchest allies to reverse their false claims or be sued for defamation. The warnings were ignored by the campaign and now they are facing the consequences. In addition to Giuliani's $1.3 billion lawsuit, attorney Sidney Powell-- who was one of the most egregious election misinformers-- was also sued by Dominion for "at least $1.3 billion," according to AP News.

Dominion also hinted at more defamation lawsuits to come, listing other prominent far-right election conspirators such "Russell Ramsland, L. Lin Wood, Mike Lindell, Patrick Byrne, Lou Dobbs, Fox News, Fox Business, Newsmax, One America News Network ('OAN'), The Epoch Times, and other like-minded allies and media outlets," all named in the official court document.

The Post quoted Thomas Clare, a Dominion attorney, stating that "the company has not ruled anybody out."

"The U.S. Department of Justice has found no evidence of widespread voter fraud," Dominion stresses on its website. "The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) confirmed the 2020 election was 'the most secure in American history,' adding, 'There is no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes, or was in any way compromised.'"

From Your Site Articles
Related Articles Around the Web

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Mark Levin

Politico reported Friday that John Eastman, the disgraced ex-law professor who formulated many of former President Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election results, was also apparently in communication with Fox News host Mark Levin. The story gets even more interesting from there, revealing the shell game that right-wing media personalities engage in while doubling as political operatives.

A legal filing by Eastman’s attorneys reveals that, among the messages Eastman is still attempting to conceal from the House January 6 committee are 12 pieces of correspondence with an individual matching Levin’s description as “a radio talk show host, is also an attorney, former long-time President (and current board chairman) of a public interest law firm, and also a former fellow at The Claremont Institute.” Other details, including a sloppy attempt to redact an email address, also connect to Levin, who did not respond to Politico’s requests for comment.

Keep reading... Show less

Sen. Wendy Rogers

Youtube Screenshot

There have been powerful indicators of the full-bore radicalization of the Republican Party in the past year: the 100-plus extremist candidates it fielded this year, the apparent takeover of the party apparatus in Oregon, the appearance of Republican officials at white nationalist gatherings. All of those are mostly rough gauges or anecdotal evidence, however; it’s been difficult to get a clear picture of just how deeply the extremism has penetrated the party.

Using social media as a kind of proxy for their real-world outreach—a reasonable approach, since there are few politicians now who don’t use social media—the Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights decided to get a clearer picture of the reach of extremist influences in official halls of power by examining how many elected officials participate in extremist Facebook groups. What it found was deeply troubling: 875 legislators in all 50 states, constituting nearly 22% of all elected GOP lawmakers, identified as participating members of extremist Facebook groups.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}