Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.
Monday, March 25, 2019

Very few Republican operatives knew the Nixon gang as intimately as Roger Stone, the legendary trickster whose back is adorned with an enormous Tricky Dick tattoo. And very few know New Jersey politics as well as Stone, who toiled among the party faithful in many campaigns since 1980, when he first ran the Garden State for Ronald Reagan.

So when he suggests that “Bridgegate” is Watergate – from the imponderable stupidity of the original crime to the profound peril of the ongoing cover-up – attention should be paid. Especially on the day when the U.S. Attorney’s office investigating the Port Authority’s decision to close three lanes of traffic on the world’s busiest bridge issues subpoenas to the Christie campaign and the New Jersey Republican Party.

Speaking with The National Memo on Thursday afternoon, Stone said: “This is about hubris, this is about an arrogance and right out of the dark side of Nixon’s playbook. It’s what ultimately brought Nixon down. There was no reason to break into the Watergate, there was no reason to spy on your enemies. His foreign policy was popular, the economy was good, and he was getting re-elected. Just like there was no reason to close these lanes on the George Washington Bridge – although just like with the break-in of Watergate, we still don’t really know why they did that.” He doesn’t buy the theory that the Christie aides were punishing the mayor of Fort Lee for refusing to endorse the Republican governor — and thinks it more likely that they were trying to harm State Senator Loretta Weinberg, a determined Christie antagonist whose district includes Fort Lee.

To Stone, the governor’s explanations rang false from the beginning – and reminded him of the verbal traps Nixon set for himself. He simply doesn’t believe that Bridget Kelly, the deputy chief of staff fired by Christie for “lying” to him, took the initiative to close the bridge lanes.

“The mentality that existed around Nixon – that Teutonic, buttoned-down, we-give-you-orders, you-carry-them-out – that mentality exists inside this administration…It just doesn’t seem plausible to me that this Kelly woman, who seems perfectly pleasant, stepped up to her computer and said, ‘Time for traffic problems in Fort Lee.’ Someone told her to do that.”  Stone says the dubious effort to blame her and a few others is the telltale sign of “a cover-up.”

Stone doesn’t know Kelly personally, but he has known David Wildstein, the Port Authority official who resigned after his role in the bridge closings was revealed, for 35 years.  “He’s the G. Gordon Liddy of this tale,” he said, referring to the maniacal Watergate conspirator who secretly concocted plots to firebomb and even murder Nixon’s political adversaries. “He’s the 100 percent soldier, the kamikaze. This guy has thrown so many bombs I’m surprised he’s got hands left.”

When The Wall Street Journal recently published a photo of Christie with Wildstein taken last September 11 – at the height of the lane-closing crisis – Stone was reminded of a classic Watergate question. The photo surfaced after Christie had claimed during his two-hour Bridgegate press conference that he didn’t know Wildstein well and hadn’t spoken with him for “a long time.”

“We’re asked to believe that they never discussed it,” noted Stone with undisguised sarcasm. “What this becomes is, ‘What did the governor know and when did he know it?’ That’s why I argue that [the scandal is] now a tar baby. First of all, there are now so many people with knowledge of what actually happened; some of them will be facing fines or prison and certainly public humiliation; and how do we know that none of them is going to implicate the governor, either through evidence or testimony? We don’t. And because of the governor being very precise about what he knew and when he knew it, anything that proves a contradiction means this guy is history. “

In an essay published on Wednesday by the Daily Caller – the right-wing website edited by Tucker Carlson where the dapper Stone serves as “fashion editor” – he laid out a series of comparisons between the scandals, casting various characters around Christie as members of Nixon’s Watergate crew:

Port Authority Chairman and former Attorney General David Samson is a gentleman of caution, sober judgment, and integrity. His role is unclear. Like Attorney General John Mitchell with Nixon, Samson has been a calming influence on Christie and his henchmen, one of the few “grey hairs” Christie listens to. Port Authority official and ex-State Senator Bill Baroni reminds me of [Nixon deputy campaign manager] Jeb Magruder: handsome, articulate, but ineffective. [Christie press secretary Michael] Drewniak plays the role of Nixon flack Ron Ziegler. GOP Chairman Bill Stepian is the scheming  [Nixon White House counsel] Chuck Colson. Before it’s over we will hear from all of them.
Just as Nixon fired his top aides H.R Haldeman and John Ehrlichman while insisting he knew nothing of the Watergate break-in or cover-up, Christie fired hatchetman David Wildstein and aide Bridget Ann Kelley [sic], laying the blame on them. While Wildstein (whom I have known since 1979, when he was Harold Stassen’s presidential campaign manager) initially pled the Fifth Amendment, he is now prepared, according to his lawyer, to testify fully in return for full immunity. Is Wildstein the G. Gordon Liddy of this drama … or is he John Dean? Then again maybe Kelley will beat Wildstein to the prosecutors. Maybe she’s John Dean.”

  • Share this on Google+0
  • Share this on Linkedin0
  • Share this on Reddit0
  • Print this page
  • 612

122 responses to “To Roger Stone, Bridgegate ‘Cover-Up’ Is Another Watergate — And He Would Know”

  1. rhallnj says:

    Who gets to be John Dean? It would be wonderful if Christie had a taping system in Drumthwacket.

  2. Bill Boltz says:

    Christie’s presidential ambitions should be over. I followed the Watergate break-in when it happened and this “Bridgegate” scandal is so similar that Christie had better start looking for a way-out of prison. What an idiot.

  3. Mark Forsyth says:

    Christie will never see the next republican convention.He is dead in the water and the only thing remaining is to take him out of politics.

  4. Dominick Vila says:

    Isn’t it time to start talking about the impact of Bridgegate on the 2016 presidential election? Christie is toast, it is time to move on and start looking at the after effect of his somewhat unexpected departure from the national limelight.

    • FT66 says:

      I am glad Dominick that you are now joining us who thought right from the beginning what Christie and his people did was totally unacceptable. I do not blame you. As we goby, you are getting more information like most do now, on this Bridgegate scandal.

      • disqus_fsqeoY3FsG says:

        There was an article written In May of 2012 and it was concerning some controversy regarding Pensions in 2011. “Despite Guadagno’s involvement in a criminal investigation of pension abuse, Christie has not appointed a special prosecutor.” http://investigations.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/05/14/11690662-gov-christies-pension-issue-nj-probe-looks-at-running-mate-double-dipping?lite
        Not their first rodeo when it comes to controversy.

        • daniel bostdorf says:

          hummm….

          Very few Republican operatives knew the Nixon gang as intimately as Roger Stone, the legendary trickster whose back is adorned with an enormous Tricky Dick tattoo. And very few know New Jersey politics as well as Stone, who toiled among the party faithful in many campaigns since 1980, when he first ran the Garden State for Ronald Reagan……So when he suggests that “Bridgegate” is Watergate – from
          the imponderable stupidity of the original crime to the profound peril of the ongoing cover-up – attention should be paid. Especially on the day when the U.S. Attorney’s office investigating the Port Authority’s
          decision to close three lanes of traffic on the world’s busiest bridge issues subpoenas to the Christie campaign and the New Jersey Republican Party.

          • disqus_fsqeoY3FsG says:

            I agree closing down 3 lanes of the busiest bridge for four days including the 9/11 anniversary was sheer stupidity and the cover up just displayed their incompetence and their feeling of thinking they are untouchable. I still don’t understand why, what purpose and was it worth possibly your political career. I do not believe that anyone in his administration does anything without his knowledge.

          • daniel bostdorf says:

            Christie knew as Nixon knew….Christie and team forgot lesson of history that is all…they got caught…

      • Dominick Vila says:

        If you go back to posts I made about two weeks ago you will find that I believe the crux of Bridgegate was abuse of power. The comments I made thereafter were focused on political tactics and how useful it would have been to use someone like Christie to keep more powerful opponents, such as Jeb Bush, at bay during the GOP 2016 nomination process.
        Christie is history, the question now is who may win the GOP nomination in 2016?

        • FT66 says:

          Sorry Dominick, if I go back to what you wrote two weeks ago, you said: This issue of Christie might backfire on us. Myself, if I make a mistake and realise it is a mistake, I straight away apologise and move forward. Everyone of us makes mistakes. We are not angels.

    • daniel bostdorf says:

      Jeb Bush will run now.

      • DirkVanden says:

        you’re forgetting Sarah Palin. I’m praying she runs for POTUS against Hillary! That would end the GOP forever.

        • daniel bostdorf says:

          That thought is the best laugh I have had in a while….

        • mikem42 says:

          Maybe she’ll select John McCain as her running mate. She does owe him, after all.

          • DirkVanden says:

            don’t worry. she blames him for their loss. that woman fully intends to be President. Maybe the T Potty will run her against Jeb and Hillary.

          • Barbara Morgan says:

            Being a woman I don’t think that a woman’s place should just be in the home but when it comes to Sara Palin I think differently. She has a special needs child that needs extra attention from both parents not just his dad, who seems to be the only parent giving him that extra attention since Palin was chosen to be John McClain. She always can’t claim that she and her family have “family values” a daughter had a child in her teens and was unmarried, a son married a woman months before she had their baby then they divorced within months of the baby.s birth.I know the thinking about the daughter and son is old fashioned and isn’t the real world but my dislike for Sarah Palin stems from the fact that she has always seemed to put herself and her politics ahead of her children and husband especially their special needs child and the children still at home now and who were at home in 2008 when she became a vice president candidate.

          • plc97477 says:

            I doubt that taking palin out of the limelight will put her in a mothering mode. She just doesn’t have it in her.

          • dpaano says:

            She may pick The Donald…..then we KNOW the GOP is done!

  5. Buford2k11 says:

    Has anyone noticed that the Koch boys seem to choose people with a criminal background??? Rick Scott?? or they back those with a promise of corruption??? there are other scandals in other states that needs the light of justice…How do you say Wisconsin?

    • Allan Richardson says:

      They find the smartest crooks and say “Become OUR crook and you can do better than by yourself.” In the final analysis, the “movement” of conservative politics has allied itself with a form of Mafia, using crime (and crime profits), intimidation, deceit and bullying to achieve their “noble” aims.

      Dostoevsky once wrote a parable, in the form of a chapter of “The Brothers Karamazov” entitled “Christ and the Inquisitor.” In this story, the Inquisition arrests a man who turns out to be the ACTUAL Jesus, and the inquisitor KNOWS AND ADMITS that he is torturing the Lord he supposedly worships. In their discussion, the three temptations in the desert, which Christ rejected, come up. At that point, the inquisitor claims that Christ made a MISTAKE by rejecting Satan’s temptation of working with the powers of the worldly rulers, and says that his CHURCH (the author was surely thinking of his own Russian Orthodox Church, and the other national churches of his day, as well as the inquisitor’s Roman Catholic Church) had since CORRECTED the mistake of Christ, and thereby had produced MILLIONS more converts than the original Apostles had done with their “turn the other cheek” strategy. Of course, the Inquisition itself represents the culmination of that “correction.”

      Ironically, even as our previous President was busy using force to spread his “Christian” policies domestically and globally, his wife Laura, in an interview, admitted that this story was one of her favorite literary passages. She did NOT SAY whether she takes this story the way you and I might (showing the corruption of many organized religions), which would imply that she disapproved of her husband’s policies, or she takes it as a how-to instruction and sides with the inquisitor.

      It has seemed to me for a long time that the “conservative” movement in the US has been operating on the inquisitor’s side for some time, believing that actions which are normally evil and criminal are “holy” when they are done for the sake of their side. This includes LYING about what the other side has done, what it believes, whom it includes, and what its future aims are (like the oxymoron “Muslim Socialist”), to get votes from its base against their own interests, and passing laws designed to keep the other side’s voters from being able to vote (by lying about the purpose of those laws and claiming “fraud” with absolutely no empirical evidence).

      If “conservatives” believe it is right and moral to do all those things, why not clog the roads and withhold relief funds as a form of political payback?

      • daniel bostdorf says:

        What do you think of the articles “dirty tricks” angle?

        • Allan Richardson says:

          Dirty tricks are considered standard operating procedure for this kind of political mind. And to KarenJ, the crooks they recruited probably WERE smart initially; their arrogance (in both examples being discussed) at their prior successes led them to make stupid mistakes.

      • CPAinNewYork says:

        Excellent post. Very entertaining and informative. You seem to have done your homework.

      • KarenJ says:

        I disagree with only one point: “the smartest crooks”. The smartest crooks don’t get caught.

        These Christie crooks are “The Gang Who Couldn’t Shoot Straight”.

      • CrankyToo says:

        Brilliant post, Allan!

      • howa4x says:

        Very well written

      • Independent1 says:

        You captured the picture exactly!! I’ve been calling the GOP the American Mafia for quite some time. I appreciate that I’m not the only one who can see that the GOP today is nothing but a consortium of thugs whose main intent is to separate the American masses from as much of their hard earned monies as it is possible.

        Even with respect to your comment: “This includes LYING about what the other side has done….”

        Mitt Romney did this in spades during not only the GOP debates running up the election campaign, but also during the debates with Obama – I don’t recall hearing one truth come out of his mouth during any of the three debates. It’s really a sad commentary that a candidate for president could have spent the better part of a couple hours spouting one lie after another on national TV (not once but 3 times), and the American public is so clueless as to have come away thinking that a pathological LIAR had out performed a president who was doing the best he could to tell the truth amidst a barrage of lies.

        And even when Newt Gingrich pushed Mitt during one of the GOP debates about the lying from the PAC that was running the TV ads and robo calls against Newt, Mitt admitted to the lying and claimed that it was okay to lie whenever you’r trying to win votes. So as you point out, lying is the default mantra for the GOP, on top of deceit, voter suppression, outright robbery, and whatever other devious pursuit comes to mind.

    • Guest says:

      What do you think of Roger Stone?

    • daniel bostdorf says:

      What do you think of Roger Stone and how Christie’s mess is like Watergate?

    • mikem42 says:

      Please tell me that’s true. I hate the thought of Wisconsin being a “red state”. It’s the dairyland of America, for criminy sakes.

    • Bill Boltz says:

      Please don’t forget Illinois…..well….how could you? LOL

      • Buford2k11 says:

        Heh, I couldn’t forget Illinois, no way…My wife grew up in Cicero, with many brothers and sisters and cousins and friends…it was funny when I mentioned to folks that my wife was from Cicero, the reactions were from…”and you survived?” to “WHY”? I actually stood on the spot of the “Valentines Day Massacre”…this is the only fly over state I don’t fly over…

    • daniel bostdorf says:

      I was wondering….What do you think of the articles “dirty tricks” angle?

      • Buford2k11 says:

        I didn’t know there was going to be a quiz…the dog ate my homework…dirty tricks are just that…there are always “angles”…it depends on your perspective…if you be a lowly soldier in the group, a dirty trick could be moving around traffic cones…or if you be in the upper echelon, a dirty trick could be using your friends cell phone for child porn…subjective, conjunctive and invective…now, recess???

    • plc97477 says:

      Maybe cus they are easier to blackmail?

  6. daniel bostdorf says:

    As usual, Joe writes an article that gives us much more perspective about the context of political situations that occur. This stems from Conasons 40+ year career in journalism. He is “old school” that demands thinking before writing. And putting actions into a sense of historic perspective.

    Resurrecting Roger Stone is essential to understand the world of political dirty tricks….and if E. Howard Hunt were alive, I dare say Conason would have had a sit down with him too…now THAT would have been a conversation…Roger Stone and E. Howard Hunt …

    What Christie and his dirty tricksters have done is straight out of the political “dirty tricks ” playbook practiced by Stone… Roger Stone knows that “if it walks like watergate, smells like watergate, looks like watergate, and those involved act like its watergate”…it’s Watergate part 2.

    “STONES RULES:”
    “Unless you can fake sincerity, you’ll get nowhere in this business.” “Politics with me isn’t theater. It’s performance art. Sometimes, for its own sake.” “Always praise ’em before you hit ’em.” “Admit nothing, deny everything, launch counterattack.”

    About Roger Stone: Stone became a convert to conservatism as a teen and volunteer in Goldwater’s 1964 campaign. In 2007, he stated he was a conservative with libertarian yearnings. When he was a student in 1972 at George Washington University, henvited Jeb Magruder (Nixon staff) to speak at a Young Republicans Club….After this meeting, he got a job from Magruder being on Richard Nixon’s highly controversial Committee to Re-elect the President…… Stone started his dirty tricks by contributing money to any possible Nixon rivals by putting the contribution in the name of the Young Socialist Alliance . He would then anonymously slip the contribution receipt to the news media most notable the right wing Manchester Union-Leader. He also placed a spy into Hubert Humphrey’s campaign as Humphrey’s personal driver. Stone was reported to have stated: “By night, I’m trafficking in the black arts. Nixon’s people were obsessed with intelligence.” After Nixon resigned, Stone went to work for Bob Dole, then was fired after columnist Jack Anderson publicly identified Stone as a Nixon dirty trickster. In 1976 he worked in Ronald Reagan’s campaign for president, and in 1977 became national chairman of the Young Republicans….After 2000 election–Stone set up street demonstrations in Florida to protest the recounts.” He also organized the so-called “Brooks Brothers riot” where Republican congressional staff members protested outside an office where ballots were being recounted”… and on and on…He wrote a book about the Kennedy assassination and claims LBJ was behind it….

    Along with Stone—do you remember Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy?

    If you don’t—get reading..

    “From 1949 to 1970, Hunt served as a CIA officer. Along with G. Gordon Liddy and others, Hunt was one of the Nixon White House “plumbers” — a secret team of operatives charged with fixing “leaks” (real or perceived causes of confidential Administration information being leaked to outside parties). Hunt and Liddy engineered the first Watergate burglary and other undercover operations for the Nixon Administration. In the ensuing Watergate Scandal, Hunt was convicted of burglary, conspiracy, and wiretapping, eventually serving 33 months in prison.”

    It was also alleged that he was one of the “bums” spotted at the Grassy Knoll in Dallas on the day Kennedy was assassinated….lets not go there with conspiracy theories because this article is about Roger Stone knowing that Christies dirty tricks team is as bad as Nixon’s…

    The irony here is that YESTERDAY the 23rd was the day Hunt died in 2007 at age 88.

    NY Times obit article:
    E. Howard Hunt, a cold warrior for the Central Intelligence Agency who left the spy service in disillusionment, joined the Nixon White House as a secret agent and bungled the break-in at the Watergate that brought the president down in disgrace, died Tuesday in Miami. He was 88.

    More here: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/24/obituaries/24hunt.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

    Conason’s article is extremely important as it relates to dirty tricks politics being practiced by Christie …

    Those who forget the lessons of history are going to repeat them..and Christie and his trickesters did just that..

    I wonder if any of them have a”Tricky Dick tattoo” on their backs?

  7. KarenJ says:

    OMG, I love this take-down of The Great White Hope — and the other GOP/TP pretenders to the throne.

    • daniel bostdorf says:

      I agree—So—What do you think of Roger Stone and how Christie’s mess is like Watergate?

      Humpty Christie sat on his bully wall..
      Humpty Christie had a bully’s fall…
      All the Christie king makers horses and all the Christie King makers men…

      Couldn’t put the bully Christie back together again…

      Watergate 2 is here…

      • KarenJ says:

        There are more parallels in both -Gates than even I realized.
        You know what I’d REALLY like? For federal investigators to return to the scene of the crimes in Alaska, and dig farther into Sarah and Todd Palin’s part in the corruption that still swirls around their Rep. Don Young and some of Palin’s remaining administration aides still working for the current governor Sean Parnell.

        The Feds should really talk to some of the journalists up there, like Lisa Demer of the ADN, and the couple who publish Alaska Dispatch.

        • daniel bostdorf says:

          I agree—So—What do you think of Roger Stone and how Christie’s mess is like Watergate?

          Humpty Christie sat on his bully wall..
          Humpty Christie had a bully’s fall…
          All the Christie king makers horses and all the Christie King makers men…

          Couldn’t put the bully Christie back together again…

          Watergate 2 is here…

        • mikem42 says:

          I think you have a good point, but also think Alaska is a world unto itself. The powers in the lower 48 don’t seem interested in pursuing anything in Alaska. Palin misused funds in Wasilla even before becoming half governor. Ted Stevens and Don Young were as corrupt as they come, and not much happens.

      • daniel bostdorf says:

        There must be a burp in the NM commentary system….my real post is below….weird.

  8. Canistercook says:

    Well it sure sounds like a lot of you don’t like Christie or the Kochs and your minds are closed. We sure are a divided nation!

    • mikem42 says:

      Really, please tell us what’s to like about any of these three. They are arrogant, power hungry men who put self ahead of state or country. If that is closed minded, well so be it. We see the results of their actions and cringe. That’s not divided, that’s understanding what is happening. If they were Dems, we would not support them, period.

      • Canistercook says:

        Guess you support Clinton who did not have ‘sex’ and Obama ‘You can keep your insurance’ and people like Jesse Jackson’s son because you MUST support them if they are ‘Democrats’. What happened to unbiased good judgement?

        • mikem42 says:

          Being a Democrat, I did support Clinton until he started selling us out in NAFTA and his full throated support of Wall Street. The Monica Lewinsky affair was disturbing, but personal behavior isn’t a game breaker, or we would be in trouble with most presidents, where the ladies are involved. Jackson, Jr. was on the take, and got what he deserved and I don’t support that type of thing by either side. As for support of Obama and the ACA, yes I do. Health insurance for all should be a no brainer for a country as advanced as the USA.

          • Canistercook says:

            I support good health care but also requiring those that abuse their bodies to pay for it. Our system has just become a big pay off for the medical insurance companies, hospitals, doctors and drug companies.
            ACA just endorses it and will tax our productive segment of our society to pay the bills. But it will buy votes for the party. Why do you think our country is going downhill? The left and the right are brainwashing us and ‘buying’ votes which is why I scorn them both. No one ‘buys’ my vote by giving me ‘entitlements’.

          • mikem42 says:

            Are you to be the sole judge of those who “abuse their bodies”? While I agree that the Medical Insurance structure in the country is a mess, due to the companies gaming the system, that is the best argument for single payer system, such as Medicare or V.A. Giving everyone affordable health insurance is not an entitlement, it is just the right thing to do in a civilized and industrialized country. When you get to social security and Medicare age, we’ll see if you consider them entitlements. They are both earned benefits, that without, we would have seniors dying in the streets.

          • Canistercook says:

            No not the sole judge but lung cancer often results from smoking but not always. I thought as a senior I contributed to Medicare along with my Company for many years and I had ‘earned’ and paid for the right to it but for the privilege of visiting my doctor twice a year I now pay the government $500 a month plus co-payments. I have discovered it is a Ponzi scheme and is an entitlement to some and a tax burden to others. If Social Security was being well run it would not be an entitlement, but it is not well run so much of it is. Have you ever wondered why government workers demand that we contribute to it but they don’t! Our medical costs are almost double what other ‘civilized’ countries pay based on their incomes. We sure have been brainwashed into believing that ‘government’ can solve our problems while they are creating our problems.

          • mikem42 says:

            First of all, don’t confuse government workers with the political class. We need gov. workers, and we need politicians who will stop improving their situation to the detriment of their constituents. As for paying $500 a month to the “govern

          • Canistercook says:

            Your Medicare premium is based by the government on your taxable income . It is not a Secondary insurance it is a TAX. If you don’t earn much you don’t pay for it. Wonder how many of the ‘deadbeats’ are single mothers, unemployed, drifters, winos and workers in the ‘underground economy’. We will never know because the government is too busy checking the 1040’s of those workers that pick up the bills,..

          • mikem42 says:

            No more from me after this ludicrous lying piece of crap. You are a nasty and uncaring individual. You should not spread your crap anymore, but you will.

          • Canistercook says:

            Well, if you think I am lying I suggest you get educated. The IRS can confirm what I have said except they call it a ‘Premium or an Adjustment fee’ not a Tax, which it is, and it is deducted from peoples monthly social security check based on their 1040 income..

      • Canistercook says:

        Won’t help since your ‘mind is made up’.

        • mikem42 says:

          Couldn’t come up with anything? You can’t persuade anyone over to your side of the argument if you offer no response. I didn’t prejudge them, only after seeing their actions did I form my dislike for them.

          • Canistercook says:

            Since I don’t have a ‘side’ yet because I don’t have all the facts I am just asking that people keep an open mind until ‘all’ the facts are known. I am not pro or anti Christie ‘yet’!

          • mikem42 says:

            Look Cc, I’m too old to wait for all the facts to develop the way these things drag out. But, I have heard/read enough to tell me that Christie is and has been a political bully

          • Canistercook says:

            Neither Christie or Palin nor Obama or Hillary has enough management experience to properly run our country. It is a demanding job!
            Unfortunatly those who have enough background are often torn apart by one or the other side in the media, We are falling down and are desperately in need of a REAL leader. I just hope he or she shows up in time!
            When people need work and pro or anti Abortion or free birth control pills are what the parties are using to sway voters we have a BIG problem. ..

          • mikem42 says:

            A corrupt governor and a half term governor and you put H. Clinton in with them? She may not be my first choice or yours, but she so outshines the other two by her life experience and governmental positions held. The right always uses abortion and contraception as red herrings, along with guns, the bible, creationism etc. to keep their followers down. Jobs, jobs, jobs. That is what is needed, and then the taxes that flow from them will solve many of our problems. We will be a 3rd world country in another generation if this isn’t solved.

          • Canistercook says:

            We sure are heading in that direction. Obama loves to use Abortion, Free Birth Control Pills and the ‘middle class’ as his props since he has failed miserably on reviving our competitiveness in the real world. Hillary is nothing but another law graduate who happened to be married to Bill. We do have a problem. Too many voters don’t understand what it takes to be a LEADER!

          • mikem42 says:

            Does anything at all predate Obama with you? Abortion, contraception, attack on middle class have been issues for decades if not more. As for reviving the country economically, just go back 5 years ago and do a comparison with where we stand today.

          • Canistercook says:

            A lot pre-dates Obama. The days when we had a ship building industry, manufactured shoes and clothing, a steel industry a vibrant auto industry. The days when large numbers of children had two parents – Now a third of white, 47% of Hispanic and 73% of black children are being raised in single parent homes, many on welfare and food stamps. Corporate elites ran the country then, not the Unions.
            In the past one was expected to get a job, learn a trade and earn a living. Now it is easier to get a ‘student loan’ beget a child and get welfare, food stamps and free health care. Why WORK! Hitler blamed the Bankers and the Jews for Germany’s problems and the Democrats and Obama blame Corporations, Wall Street and the rich. Until we stop finding scapegoats and addresss the REAL problems we will continue the slide downhill. We need to get back to work and get jobs and raising the minimum wage won’t be a solution, but it will buy votes and just be another nail in our coffin. We need to get back to work!

          • mikem42 says:

            Oh, nostalgia. As I am 70+ I am aware of the days when we were makers of everything we consumed. You keep blaming people for needing help, and say they were expected to get a job. I was able to get a job almost anywhere I desired, as were most people my age. That’s because the jobs were here. They are gone now, thanks to so called trade agreements, which allowed our companies to ship jobs overseas. When there are no jobs, people need support. I love how you worked Hitler into your conversation, seems like people love to do that nowadays. He has nothing to do with this conversation. We can and must bring manufacturing jobs back here, or it will just get worse. Stop blaming the victims of the economy; put the blame where it belongs, and that is with our lawmakers who allowed corporations to desert us. Give people jobs, they will work. Stop misjudging the American people.

          • Canistercook says:

            There are jobs out there, but not the high paying ones since our exports are no longer in demand. You forget that Ford, Deere, Boeing and many other companies profited from what they sold to the rest of the world. Now we need to compete, not find scapegoats like the ‘Rich’ and Corporate CEO’s to attack. We must compete and stop rewarding government’s growth and pension systems.

          • mikem42 says:

            “There are jobs out there” is a ludicrous statement. And of course, our exports are still in demand, we just make them in other countries. The companies you mentioned had to overcome high tariffs over the years and the protectionism of foreign countries, while today, we allow production by US companies to come here untaxed. Thanks NAFTA. We’re not looking for scapegoats, we’re looking for our companies to bring the jobs back here, pay fair taxes, and compete as we always did before. Greed is what we dislike, and you should stop carrying water for the “rich and famous”.

          • Canistercook says:

            Didn’t Clinton, a Democrat, sign the NAFTA treaty? We would be in worse shape if we had not signed it. You are very misinformed on the ‘high tariffs and protectionism’. We are not affected by them but the cost of manufacturing in the USA. Unions in some industries have priced us out of the world market which is why we don’t make shoes or steel anymore. Competition is hard but not competing will be worse.

          • mikem42 says:

            If you had followed my posts, you would know that I acknowledged that Clinton signed NAFTA, and I opposed it then and gave him hell over it. As misinformed, well you really don’t know what you speak of. If unions and regulations and benefits and safety are at fault, then we might as well toss in the towel, and become like Mexico. When unions were strong in this country, the entire workforce benefited. Passing laws to allow offshoring, and even to get incentives to do so is the cause of our job loss, particularly in manufacturing. Both parties were complicit in the trade agreements, and the loss of jobs overseas. I know my solutions, what’s yours.

          • Canistercook says:

            The manufacturing base supported our Union wages and benefits in the 1960’s and we exported our cars, steel, ships,shoes,clothing, etc., all over the world. Now much of the world has become competitive and makes their own and exports these items. Your solution appears to be ‘withdraw’ from the world market, mine is ‘compete’. I believe countries that fail to compete like many in Africa are doomed to poverty. We can and we should compete but we must make the adjustment. Paying people not to work and raising the minimum wage will only dig us into a bigger hole right now.
            Skilled Silicon Valley workers are pretty highly paid without a union. Their value is set by the demand for their products.

          • Independent1 says:

            More hogwash – do you even realize that the minimum wage in Europe is $12/hour and that stores of multi-nationals that do business in both Europe and America are actually more profitable in Europe!! And why?? Because even those earning minimum wage in Europe can go into a McDonald’s and order off of the more expensive items on the menu which are more profitable. And the same would hold true for stores in America where the minimum wage help can only afford to buy items in the stores they work in if they can combine sales with their employee discount – which means the store is most likely making little or no profit on items they sell to their own employees.

            The notion that raising the min wage would reduce employment and cut company profits is the same fairytale as the trickle-down economics fairytale.

          • Independent1 says:

            And with respect to America’s competitiveness, you’d better bone up on more recent facts. Already more than 5 million manufacturing jobs have returned to America because production costs in foreign countries are escalating because foreigners want to improve their lifestyles just like American’s did 80 years ago. The time is rapidly coming when America will be the country of choice for manufacturing and many other enterprises.

            Here’s an article that you need to spend a little time reading – you’re in the dark ages:

            http://www.businessinsider.com/manufacturing-jobs-returning-to-america-2013-2

    • daniel bostdorf says:

      Ignore these types of posts please…

    • daniel bostdorf says:

      Very few Republican operatives knew the Nixon gang as intimately as Roger Stone, the legendary trickster whose back is adorned with an enormous Tricky Dick tattoo. And very few know New Jersey politics as well as Stone, who toiled among the party faithful in many campaigns since 1980, when he first ran the Garden State for Ronald Reagan.

      So when he suggests that “Bridgegate” is Watergate – from
      the imponderable stupidity of the original crime to the profound peril
      of the ongoing cover-up – attention should be paid. Especially on the
      day when the U.S. Attorney’s office investigating the Port Authority’s
      decision to close three lanes of traffic on the world’s busiest bridge issues subpoenas to the Christie campaign and the New Jersey Republican Party.

      Speaking with The National Memo on Thursday afternoon, Stone
      said: “This is about hubris, this is about an arrogance and right out
      of the dark side of Nixon’s playbook. It’s what ultimately brought Nixon down. There was no reason to break into the Watergate, there was no reason to spy on your enemies. His foreign policy was popular, the economy was good, and he was getting re-elected. Just like there was no reason to close these lanes on the George Washington Bridge – although just like with the break-in of Watergate, we still don’t really know why they did that.” He doesn’t buy the theory that the Christie aides were punishing the mayor of Fort Lee for refusing to endorse the Republican governor — and thinks it more likely that they were trying to harm State Senator Loretta Weinberg, a determined Christie antagonist whose
      district includes Fort Lee.

      To Stone, the governor’s explanations rang false from the beginning and reminded him of the verbal traps Nixon set for himself. He simply doesn’t believe that Bridget Kelly, the deputy chief of staff fired by Christie for “lying” to him, took the initiative to close the bridge lanes.

      • Canistercook says:

        Well if like for the IRS scandal and Benghazi we can have a complete and honest hearing on these issues we might know the truth about these things. Would sure be nice!

        • daniel bostdorf says:

          Very few Republican operatives knew the Nixon gang as intimately as Roger Stone,
          the legendary trickster whose back is adorned with an enormous Tricky
          Dick tattoo. And very few know New Jersey politics as well as Stone, who
          toiled among the party faithful in many campaigns since 1980, when he
          first ran the Garden State for Ronald Reagan.

          So when he suggests that “Bridgegate” is Watergate – from
          the imponderable stupidity of the original crime to the profound peril
          of the ongoing cover-up – attention should be paid. Especially on the
          day when the U.S. Attorney’s office investigating the Port Authority’s
          decision to close three lanes of traffic on the world’s busiest bridge issues subpoenas to the Christie campaign and the New Jersey Republican Party.

          Speaking with The National Memo on Thursday afternoon, Stone
          said: “This is about hubris, this is about an arrogance and right out
          of the dark side of Nixon’s playbook. It’s what ultimately brought Nixon
          down. There was no reason to break into the Watergate, there was no
          reason to spy on your enemies. His foreign policy was popular, the
          economy was good, and he was getting re-elected. Just like there was no
          reason to close these lanes on the George Washington Bridge – although
          just like with the break-in of Watergate, we still don’t really know why
          they did that.” He doesn’t buy the theory that the Christie aides were
          punishing the mayor of Fort Lee for refusing to endorse the Republican
          governor — and thinks it more likely that they were trying to harm State
          Senator Loretta Weinberg, a determined Christie antagonist whose
          district includes Fort Lee.

          To Stone, the governor’s explanations rang false from the beginning –
          and reminded him of the verbal traps Nixon set for himself. He simply
          doesn’t believe that Bridget Kelly, the deputy chief of staff fired by
          Christie for “lying” to him, took the initiative to close the bridge
          lanes.

          “The mentality that existed around Nixon – that Teutonic,
          buttoned-down, we-give-you-orders, you-carry-them-out – that mentality
          exists inside this administration…It just doesn’t seem plausible to me
          that this Kelly woman, who seems perfectly pleasant, stepped up to her
          computer and said, ‘Time for traffic problems in Fort Lee.’ Someone told
          her to do that.” Stone says the dubious effort to blame her and a few
          others is the telltale sign of “a cover-up.”

          Stone doesn’t know Kelly personally, but he has known David
          Wildstein, the Port Authority official who resigned after his role in
          the bridge closings was revealed, for 35 years. “He’s the G. Gordon
          Liddy of this tale,” he said, referring to the maniacal Watergate
          conspirator who secretly concocted plots to firebomb and even murder
          Nixon’s political adversaries. “He’s the 100 percent soldier, the
          kamikaze. This guy has thrown so many bombs I’m surprised he’s got hands
          left.”

          When The Wall Street Journal recently published a photo of Christie with
          Wildstein taken last September 11 – at the height of the lane-closing
          crisis – Stone was reminded of a classic Watergate question. The photo
          surfaced after Christie had claimed during his two-hour Bridgegate press
          conference that he didn’t know Wildstein well and hadn’t spoken with
          him for “a long time.”

          “We’re asked to believe that they never discussed it,” noted Stone
          with undisguised sarcasm. “What this becomes is, ‘What did the governor
          know and when did he know it?’ That’s why I argue that [the scandal is]
          now a tar baby. First of all, there are now so many people with
          knowledge of what actually happened; some of them will be facing fines
          or prison and certainly public humiliation; and how do we know that none
          of them is going to implicate the governor, either through evidence or
          testimony? We don’t. And because of the governor being very precise
          about what he knew and when he knew it, anything that proves a
          contradiction means this guy is history. “

    • Kurt CPI says:

      As the consummate independent, I can tell you that party loyalty doesn’t play into this. This doesn’t just “sound like a lot”, it’s huge. Wielding the power of elected office to inflict damage on a political opponent is bad enough. But when you do it at the expense of the people who elected you, you’ve crossed far too far over the line. This is immoral, outrageous and, I hope, unpardonable.

      • Canistercook says:

        Sure sounds to me that you are not very ‘independent’!

        • Independent1 says:

          Your comment makes it clear that you have absolutely no perspective on anything!! Independents are the only truly open minded voters in the country. All the rest have ideologies that dictate how they vote. You are obviously totally clueless!!!!

    • Independent1 says:

      Only a GOP sheeple such as yourself would even suggest that what Christie and his Mafia based administration did was even remotely acceptable.

  9. howa4x says:

    My last post about Christie compared him to how Nixon handled the cover up. He is now in the in the midst of swirling investigations. His Lt governor is the target of a US attorney probe into Mayor Zimmer’s allegations about Sandy aid. He will not get his former chief of staff confirmed as State Attorney general due to his impending role in the bridges of Bergen county saga. Soon his commissioner of community affairs will be under investigation on Sandy aid. Add to that a HUD investigation as to why he spent 2 million more for a commercial to put his family in during an election. Speaking about Sandy aid my friend at the shore has just gotten most of but not all his money over 1 year after the storm, and none of his neighbors has gotten anything. It seems the DCA keeps changing requirements and the consultants administering the program don’t know what they are doing. Over 4000 people in his shore county are still living outside of their primary residence. That will be the next scandal.
    Even if Christie survives which is even money at this point, he will be accused of making terrible personnel choices and that doesn’t bode well for any candidate

  10. Kurt CPI says:

    It’s a shame that politicians believe they can do anything they want without consequence. It’s like catching some accountant at embezzlement after they’ve been getting away with it for a decade. They’re so shocked – not at their crime, but at the fact that they got caught. Like a child, they’ll make up any kind of ridiculous lie to to deny their guilt or shift it to someone. The two investigations are the right thing to do. If, as with any criminal, Christie is found guilty he should be fired, jailed and fined.

    • daniel bostdorf says:

      He will get a pardon from the next governor after he resigns….Kim Guadagno was elected New Jersey’s first Lieutenant Governor in November 2009. As Governor Chris Christie’s running mate…

      Pardon just like Nixon after Watergate….ask Roger Stone…he knows…

  11. Obama's Recession says:

    When Barack Obama is
    removed from office, historians will not that the Left’s well-orchestrated
    attack on Christie was the first step in the President’s early exit . By
    calling for Christie’s “impeachment,” the Democrat
    Party/progressive-left media have justified the removal from office of any
    politician that abuses government power, even for an action as minor as closing
    a traffic lane. Thanks to the Left, when the GOP gets majority control of Senate & House in
    November, they will have the justification needed to
    impeach Obama on a host of criminal activities .including NSA
    spying on citizens,using the IRS and FBI to terrorize political opponents,
    lying about Obamacare, the Benghazi (which will take down Hillary Clinton
    as well.)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.