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Rep, Mo Brooks

Photo by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (Public domain)

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL) is being sued by Congressman Eric Swalwell (D-CA) for his role in allegedly inciting the January 6 insurrection. Brooks infamously evaded being served by going to great lengths, resulting in forcing the process server to hand the papers to his wife at their home.

Brooks on January 6 spoke at Trump's MAGA rally and told the estimated 12,000 attendees, "Today is the day American patriots start taking down names and kicking ass." But Brooks was also the first member of Congress to announce he would vote to overturn the election. And in December Politico reported Brooks was "spearheading the long-shot push to overturn the election results in Congress," and noted he had organized a "trio of White House meetings, which lasted over three hours and included roughly a dozen lawmakers."

The Alabama Republican Congressman tried to get the Dept. of Justice to defend him, claiming his inciting thousands of loyal Trump cultists was a part of his job as a federal government employee. The DOJ disagreed and refused.

So now he is in court.

Brooks, who is an attorney, is reportedly representing himself.

Here's what he told the judge on Wednesday in his defense, asking to be dismissed from the lawsuit, per Reuters' legal affairs reporter Jan Wolfe.

"Brooks is 67 years old."

"Brooks has never smoked tobacco. Brooks does not consume alcohol. Brooks has never experimented with or taken illegal drugs."

"Brooks has never been arrested or convicted of any felonies or misdemeanors."

"Brooks has never had a DUI, a reckless driving ticket, or even a speeding ticket."

"Brooks has never had a motor vehicle wreck in which anyone claimed Brooks was at fault."

"Brooks has been married 45 years. Brooks has always been faithful to his wife. Together they have raised four children, all of whom are married, none of whom have been divorced, all of whom are law-abiding, none of whom have been arrested for anything, all of whom have college degrees and jobs," it says.

He concludes with one curious claim: "Brooks has a perfect ethics record…despite Democrats…having harassed Brooks with at least 38 ethics complaints."

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Former President Donald Trump's suspended Twitter account.

Photo by John Cameron on Unsplash

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Donald Trump, the former president, on Wednesday announced what he described as a class action lawsuit against "Big Tech," specifically Facebook, Twitter, and Google, and their CEOs as well. Trump for about 50 minutes ranted and railed about having been banned from the social media platforms, along with numerous other grievances.

Trump, his team, and the group supporting him, America First Policy Institute, are essentially claiming Trump's First Amendment rights were violated when he was banned from the two social media platforms, and because they have protection under federal law known as Section 230, they are an arm of the government, which experts say is false.

Legal experts are responding negatively to both the lawsuit itself and the attorneys who filed it.

Sam Brunson, Georgia Reithal Professor of Law, Loyola University Chicago, mocks their AOL email addresses and calls them "not competent."

He also calls the lawsuit a "LOLsuit."

Commercial, trademark, copyright, patent and trade secret litigation attorney Akiva Cohen calls the attorneys a "clown show."

And also mocks them for having AOL email addresses, among other things.

University of Michigan law professor, NBC News and MSNBC legal analyst, former US Attorney:

Brad Heath, DC reporter for Reuters on crime and justice: