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Europe
Photo by Alexandra_Koch from Pixabay

Europe took dramatic steps to contain the coronavirus pandemic. Its shutdowns were so tight that the eurozone economy has fallen into a recession even deeper than ours.

But guess what. Despite occasional spikes, Europe has beaten the virus down to size. With a public reassured that it could return to the beaches, bars and restaurants in relative safety, it reopened. That's why Europe "is having a much bigger snapback" than the U.S., Berenberg Bank economist Holger Schmieding told The Wall Street Journal, "and there are some indicators that it may be getting ahead."

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Photo Credit: The National Guard

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

One need only review Johns Hopkins University data to see how destructive the coronavirus pandemic was earlier this year in Europe, where the death counts on Tuesday afternoon ranged from 34,675 in Italy to 28,325 in Spain to 29,666 in France. But as staggering as those numbers are, the U.S. is now worse off: according to Hopkins, more than 120,000 people have died from COVID-19 in the U.S. — a larger death toll than Italy, Spain and France combined. And the New York Times' Matina Stevis-Gridneff is reporting that the European Union is considering a ban on travel from the U.S. this summer because it "has failed to control the scourge."

The Times reviewed the EU's "draft lists of acceptable travelers" from other parts of the world — and it is possible that the EU will "lump American visitors in with Russians and Brazilians as unwelcome."

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