The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Michael Doyle, McClatchy Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON — Two veteran California lawmakers are at loggerheads over how to expand Yosemite National Park.

A House Republican and House Democrat now have competing bills folding nearly 1,600 acres in Mariposa County into the park’s boundaries. They share some ideas. They differ, though, on key questions, including whether to offset the park’s growth by the sale of federal land elsewhere.

The explicit differences, now that they are spelled out in legislative text, could theoretically accelerate negotiations toward a final deal. Or, they could yield stalemate, over mountainous land both sides agree meets Yosemite’s high standards.

“The proposed addition to the park offers spectacular views from Henness Ridge and still has remnants of timber roads that could be adapted for hiking, riding, mountain biking, and other recreational pursuits,” Rep. Tom McClintock (R-CA), said in a statement.

This month, following extended study, McClintock introduced his version of a Yosemite park expansion bill. His congressional district includes the park and several of its surrounding gateway communities.

The land was reportedly part of naturalist John Muir’s original plan for Yosemite.

Like an earlier bill introduced 16 months ago by Rep. Jim Costa (D-CA), McClintock’s legislation authorizes the National Park Service to expand Yosemite’s western boundary through the addition of several adjacent Mariposa County parcels.

The non-profit Pacific Forest Trust owns about half of the 1,575 acres covered by the bill, and a consortium of medical professionals owns the other half. The trust bought its share with the long-term goal of conveying it to Yosemite. The doctors bought the land as an investment, potentially for a development. The development never transpired.

On Thursday, Pacific Forest Trust Vice President Paul Mason said in an interview that it was “progress” for McClintock to have introduced the bill, though Mason added that there are problems with specific parts of the legislation.

“I think it’s positive that he’s actually come to the table,” Mason said.

A staunch conservative who frequently denounces federal management of public lands, McClintock included in his bill a requirement that the Yosemite expansion only occur after the Interior Department has sold, through public auction, about 1,575 acres elsewhere.

Nationwide, Interior manages more than 400 million acres, including more than 23 million acres in California. Yosemite currently has 747,956 acres.

McClintock said the provision “assures that acquisition of this new parcel will not add further to the problem” of public land management. Costa, though, called the requirement a deal-breaker.

“That’s a precedent, of exchanging land, that doesn’t make any sense to me,” Costa said in an interview. “I don’t think the administration will support it, and I’m not so sure it will pass the Senate.”

AFP Photo/Mladen Antonov

Interested in national news? Sign up for our daily email newsletter!

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Dr. Anthony Fauci with President George W. Bush in the Oval Office on June 19, 2008

Photo by Wikimedia Commons

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet

Dr. Anthony Fauci, now 80, joined the National Institutes of Health back in 1968 and has worked with a long list of Republican presidents — from Ronald Reagan to George W. Bush to Gerald Ford. But during the COVID-19 pandemic, he has become an object of irrational hatred in the far-right MAGA movement. And journalist Alexander Bolton, in an article published by The Hill on December 1, explains why that hatred has recently become even worse.

Keep reading... Show less

President Joe Biden at the Port of Baltimore

Reprinted with permission from TomDispatch

In mid-October, President Biden announced that the Port of Los Angeles would begin operating 24 hours a day, seven days a week, joining the nearby Port of Long Beach, which had been doing so since September. The move followed weeks of White House negotiations with the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, as well as shippers like UPS and FedEx, and major retailers like Walmart and Target.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}