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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Shareblue.

 

Trump used the one-year anniversary of the racist riot in Charlottesville, Virginia, to once again play down the bile and hatred of white supremacists, who he has praised and supported throughout his presidency.

In a tweet on Saturday morning, rather than directly confront the racists set to rally a stone’s throw from the White House on Sunday, Trump said, “I condemn all types of racism and acts of violence.”

The statement echoed one of the most pro-Nazi statements made from the presidency, when Trump reacted to neo-Nazi violence by blaming people “on both sides.” He also described these racists as “very fine people.”

Last year, Heather Heyer was killed by a neo-Nazi as he drove his car into a crowd of counter-protestors at “Unite the Right,” an event organized by the so-called “alt-right,” the racist movement that became hugely influential within conservative circles, thanks to Trump and his campaign.

Since the tragedy in Charlottesville, Trump has continued to embrace racism and bigotry from the presidency.

He has pushed for black NFL players to stop taking a knee to protest police brutality against blacks, and has enshrined a series of abusive policies designed to hurt the largely Latino immigrant community, including ripping families apart at the border.

Trump called the families that have been torn apart “animals,” and has sought to dehumanize them while holding rallies to laud their abuse.

Trump wholeheartedly embraces bigotry, and his Republican Party enables and supports him in this endeavor.

In a tweet right directly following the one giving neo-Nazis another pass from the White House, Trump sought to take credit for lowered unemployment rates among Latinos and blacks. Of course, those downward trends began under President Barack Obama, years before Trump had assumed the presidency.

At that time, Trump was running around demanding Obama’s birth certificate as part of a racist conspiracy theory.

He has not changed.

The racists who caused death in Charlottesville were white supremacists. In Trump’s presidency they have seen an ally, not opposition.

Published with permission of The American Independent.

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

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