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According to a new report by The Huffington Post, House Speaker Paul Ryan may be facing a new political coup from House conservatives. And even if anti-Ryan conservatives don’t have the votes to force Ryan out, they may attempt to change House rules to weaken his pull.

Many House Republicans don’t believe preventing Ryan from the speaker post is truly possible, but the fact that these discussions are taking place is evidence of Ryan’s weakening relationship with House conservatives.

Many of those in opposition to Ryan belong to the House Freedom Caucus, which counts roughly 40 strict conservatives as members, and believe that Ryan may not have the votes needed on the first ballot. If this is the case, they believe this would give them enough leverage to change certain House rules regarding caucus representation, subcommittee staff structure, and rules-suspension votes. They also hope to change rules to allow the Republican National Congressional Committee to raise money for the Freedom Caucus.

The goal may not even be to actually change the rules — some House conservatives are hoping that a loss by Ryan on the first ballot may be enough for the camps to discuss compromise options.

Photo: U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) holds a weekly news conference at the U.S. Capitol in Washington January 7, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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