The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

NEW YORK (Reuters) – President-elect Donald Trump is nearing a settlement of about $20 million in fraud lawsuits relating to Trump University, a person familiar with the matter said on Friday.

Lawyers for the president-elect have been squaring off against students who claim they were they were lured by false promises into paying up to $35,000 to learn Trump’s real estate investing “secrets” from his “hand-picked” instructors.

There are three lawsuits relating to Trump University: two class actions in California and a case brought by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman. All would be covered in the possible settlement, the person said.

A trial in one of the cases is scheduled to begin on Nov. 28 in U.S. District Court in San Diego.

“As Attorney General Schneiderman has long said, he has always been open to a settlement that fairly compensates the many victims of Trump University who have been waiting years for a resolution,” Eric Soufer, a spokesman for Schneiderman, said in a statement.

Neither Trump’s lawyers nor lawyers representing the students immediately responded to calls for comment.

Trump has said he did not “hand pick” Trump University instructors, but that marketing language used was not to be taken literally. He has said most students gave the classes high ratings.

A court hearing in the case set for trial is scheduled in San Diego for Friday afternoon. Trump’s lawyers were expected to argue to delay the trial.

U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel, who is presiding over the two California cases, has urged both sides to settle.

Trump triggered controversy earlier this year, when he said during his election campaign that Curiel, who was born in Indiana to Mexican immigrant parents, could not be impartial because of Trump’s pledge to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

(Additional reporting by Dan Levine; Editing by Bernadette Baum)

IMAGE: Trump University DVDs are displayed at The Trump Museum near the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., July 19, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson/File Photo

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Youtube Screenshot

On July 21, Verizon followed in DirecTV’s footsteps and announced it would not be renewing its contract with the far-right conspiracy theory network One America News. Having learned nothing from its catastrophic response to DirecTV, OAN denounced Verizon and encouraged viewers to harass and boycott the “radical Marxist corporation.” And since then, OAN has only further proved its worthlessness.

Without a major carrier, OAN remains focused on national issues like a fear of roving transgender gangs harassing conservatives, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s support for gay men who flash “their genitals to little boys and girls” (she appeared on RuPaul’s Drag Race -- a show with no children -- two years ago), and Verizon’s “censorship” of OAN.

Keep reading... Show less
Youtube Screenshot

Postcards from the great American labor shortage: A couple arrives at the Seattle airport after a five-hour flight and stands in line at the car rental desk. People are angry. At the desk sits a harassed employee explaining that he simply has no cars of any kind to rent. Nothing. Why? There aren't enough employees on hand to vacuum, wash, fuel and process the cars.

Another snapshot. A couple has been driving for several hours and requires a bathroom stop. They pull into a Burger King. The doors are locked. The only service is at the drive-thru. Why? Lack of employees.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}