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5 Headphones For Every Type of Listener

Music is a very personal experience. So it stands to reason that the method you choose for hearing your music is just as idiosyncratic. Pick the right tools for the job from this selection of awesome earbud and headphone deals available right now through The National Memo Store.

FRESHeBUDS Pro Magnetic Bluetooth Earbuds

These pro-grade audio accessories sport one of the coolest, simplest features around. They power up when you pull the two magnetized earpieces apart, then turn off automatically when you put them back together. The ultimate technology paired with incredible simplicity.

Buy now: Get these energy-saving units for only $29.95, 75% off the retail price.

u-Jays Wireless On-Ear Headphones

Receiving high marks from outlets like Mac Aficionados and Digital Trends, these headphones boast the high-end sonic power of top-quality over-ear headphones … delivered wirelessly. Get extraordinary sound, integrated touch controls and 25 hours of playback — all without the tangle of wires. What more could you ask for?

Buy now: The u-Jays, which come in four different color combinations, are available for just $169.95.

Que Bluetooth In-Ear Headphones: 2-Pack

When life gets busy, wouldn’t you rather have TWO pairs of quality earbuds ready to handle your listening needs? That’s what you get with these lightweight, sweat-proof, great-sounding beauties. Use one pair at the office, another at the gym, and don’t worry about bringing them with you to every stop!

Buy now: Usually $99.99, get this double-shot of earbud goodness for only $29.99.

Boosted Acoustic Wood Headphones

You may not realize it, but the sonic-morphing properties of well-contoured wood is a listening enhancement that serious audiophiles swear by. These Boosted wood headphones offer premium sound, thumping bass and sharp treble in stylish wood ear-cupped fashion.

Buy now: Rosewood, Walnut and Beechwood models all run almost $130, but with this limited time offer, get ‘em now for only $17.99.

ARMOR-X GO-X3 Bluetooth Headphones

Finally, a pair of headphones are as active as you are. These Bluetooth-enabled headphones were engineered to sit comfortably around your ears for extended sessions no matter how fast you’re moving. Whether you’re traveling, working out or just running errands around town, you’ll have seven hours of playtime on a single charge — and you’ll feel unrestricted for every minute of it.

Buy now: Right now, these on-the-go specials are 50% off — just $29.99.

This sponsored post is brought to you by StackCommerce.

This Brain-Stimulating Music Claims to Improve Your Focus

From social media to texting, our phones have become a constant and sometimes even frightening source of distraction. The founders of Brain.fm set out to bring a touch of focus back to human minds everywhere with their audio product, Brain.fm.

At first glance, Brain.fm may appear like an ordinary audio streaming service, but the reality is much more complex. Brain.fm incorporates artificial intelligence and neurological research to craft original soundtracks specifically tailored to alter your mind to a desired state.

Whether you’re trying to focus on a highly detailed work or school project, clear your mind via meditation or simply fall asleep, Brain.fm is designed to help you get there. Its strategically engineered music is created to boost your brain efficiency and help you conquer your goals.

You can try getting your mind right for the task ahead (whatever that task may be) with a lifetime of Brain.fm for just $49.99, 75% off its $200 value while this offer lasts.

Buy now: $49.99, 75% off the MSRP

This sponsored post is brought to you by StackCommerce

New Campaign Songs For Donald Trump

Politicians using songs on the campaign trail without artist permission has long been a touchy subject, but few have earned as much scorn from the music industry as Donald J. Trump. At this point, he couldn’t play with “The Itsy Bitsy Spider” on stage without getting a phone call from Raffi’s lawyer.

Still, Trump and the RNC seem to have paid licensing fees for his campaign’s music, so irked artists don’t have much say in the matter. The National Memo wanted to help work the situation out, so we’ve assembled some alternatives for Donald — songs he can grow to love, but that are a better fit for the… tone of his campaign.

 

The Rolling Stones

What Trump played: “You Can’t Always Get What You Want”

The song is oddly appropriate, based on the millions of disappointed Republicans forced to vote for their party’s demise. Or maybe Trump picked it out for arch rival Ted Cruz. Either way, The Stones didn’t like it and filed a cease-and-desist letter.

Better option: “Sympathy for the Devil”

Trump’s conscience probably works a lot like those old cartoons: On his left shoulder he has a little devil, and on his right he has—well, nothing. He fired the angel that used to be there and refused to pay him for his work. But the Donald and his little red friend get along just fine, both being men of wealth and taste. 

Best Option: “Let It Bleed”

Given Donald Trump’s overblown speech on Thursday, he needs a track to reflect all the violence in our lawless streets. Plus, guitarist Keith Richards once pulled a knife on Trump back in 1989, so there’s no doubt he would’ve approved.

 

Queen 

What Trump played: “We Are the Champions”

When David Duke’s favorite candidate blasts a power ballad by a bisexual, non-white foreigner, everybody loses.

Better option: “I Want It All”

Trump already has a business empire, his own TV show, a skyscraper with his name on it, and he still wants to control the free world? Maybe it’s time to stop believing that this guy is running for the sake of the American people.

  

 

Neil Young

What Trump played: “Rockin’ in the Free World”

If Donald Trump took the time to listen to the song’s cynical lyrics, he’d quickly realize that it’s far from a patriotic rocker. Then again, details have never been the GOP nominee’s strong point. Just take a look at anything he’s said over the past year.

Better option: “Transformer Man”

A piercing mishmash of synthesizers and distorted falsettos, “Transformer Man” is often cited as Young’s worst song. Coincidentally, Donald Trump will eventually be recognized as America’s worst presidential candidate. It’s a match made in heaven!

 

George Harrison/The Beatles

What Trump played: “Here Comes the Sun”

The former Beatle’s family objected when Ivanka Trump marched out to the Abbey Road classic this week. Perhaps Donald chose it because Ivanka is the center of his world. Just watch out—if the sun weren’t 93 million miles away, he’d probably be dating it.

Better option: “I Me Mine”

Look, it’s Trump’s three favorite words, right there in the title! Make no mistake, however. Donald really is a humble man, the most humble. His publicist John Miller told me so.

Best option: “Beware of Darkness”

Far and away, this Harrison solo track is the best choice possible. Why, you ask? Because this suggestion came straight from the official Harrison Twitter account.

Once Sidelined, Hip-Hop Finds Grammy Spotlight With Kendrick Lamar

By Piya Sinha-Roy

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Rapper Kendrick Lamar heads into Monday’s Grammy awards with a leading 11 nominations and the chance to make history if he wins album and song of the year, categories that have traditionally shunned hip-hop artists.

In the 58-year history of the Grammy awards, only two hip-hop albums have ever won the music industry’s top prize for album of the year; Lauryn Hill’s The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in 1999 and Outkast’s Speakerboxxx/The Love Below in 2004. No rap song has won song of the year.

But while the odds are historically stacked against him, Lamar’s “To Pimp A Butterfly” album was both a commercial and critical success.

Butterfly, which sold around 5 million copies in the United States last year, topped Rolling Stone’s best albums of 2015. The magazine called it “a sprawling epic that’s both the year’s most bumptious party music and its most gripping therapy session.”

In Butterfly, 28-year-old Lamar from Compton, California, the home of hip-hop pioneers NWA, fused poetry with jazz, blues and funk in songs that mix social issues with homages to black artists like Miles Davis and Tupac Shakur.

Lamar’s anthemic “Alright,” about the obstacles that face black youths in America, is nominated for four Grammys including song of the year.

“Kendrick Lamar is stepping up to be an important voice in a very essential way,” said Brian Hiatt at Rolling Stone. “It would be a very exciting thing if Kendrick actually won album of the year.”

Lamar faces stiff competition from Taylor Swift’s 1989, country artist Chris Stapleton’s Traveller, R&B breakout The Weeknd’s Beauty Behind the Madness and blues-rock group Alabama Shakes’ Sound & Color.

The Grammy awards, decided by members of the Recording Academy rather than the public, have often shunned popular performers in favor of lesser-known musicians regarded as more artistic.

Last year, indie-rocker Beck was the surprise album of the year winner, prompting rapper Kanye West to declare afterward that Beyonce had a better album.

“The Recording Academy nominates music that they feel is the best music released in the eligibility period over the past year, so it’s not based on what’s the most-streamed or who’s the most-liked on (social media),” said Keith Caulfield, co-director of Billboard Charts.

The eligibility period for this year’s Grammys runs between Oct. 1, 2014 and Sept. 30, 2015, which disqualified Adele’s multimillion selling November release 25. Adele, however, is scheduled to perform on Monday.

(Editing by Jill Serjeant and Jeffrey Benkoe)

Photo: Kendrick Lamar at the Orange Stage, Roskilde Festival July 3, 2015. REUTERS/Simon Laessoee/Scanpix Denmark