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Jimmy Kimmel hosted the woman who made news this week on the legendary game show The Price is Right, when she won a treadmill — which was a bit of an awkward moment, as she uses a wheelchair. But don’t worry, she’s been a great sport about all of it — and Kimmel ha another great prize for her.

The Nightly Show contributor Mike Yard welcomed Hillary Clinton’s campaign to the great borough of Brooklyn, to get some advice from the locals on how she can fit in: Clothes, hair, nails, food — and tattoos.

Jon Stewart highlighted all the wonderful corruption scandals going on in his home region, from Bridgegate in New Jersey to the indictments in the New York State Senate.

David Letterman marked a key milestone as he heads toward retirement: He officially gave his two weeks’ notice.

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For nearly 50 years, the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade ruling has protected a woman's right to an abortion. It also protected many politicians' careers. Lawmakers who opposed abortion knew that as long as abortion remained available, pro-choice voters wouldn't care much about their positions on the matter.

That would be especially true of suburban mothers. Once reliable Republican voters, they have moved toward Democrats in recent elections. If the GOP wants them back, forcing their impregnated high schoolers to bear children will not help. If Roe is overturned, more than 20 states are likely to make abortion virtually illegal, as Texas has done.

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Justice Brett Kavanaugh

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court heard arguments over a Mississippi law banning abortions after the 15th week of pregnancy. The law roundly defies the court's decisions affirming a right to abortion, but the state portrays the ban as the mildest of correctives.

All Mississippi wants the justices to do, insisted state solicitor general Scott Stewart, is defer to "the people." The law, he said, came about because "many, many people vocally really just wanted to have the matter returned to them so that they could decide it — decide it locally, deal with it the way they thought best, and at least have a fighting chance to have their view prevail."

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