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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

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Late Night Roundup: ‘Minhaj’s Muslim Makeover’

Jon Stewart highlighted a recent story of a Muslim woman who was mistreated on an airplane flight — when the flight attendant refused to give her an unopened can of soda — in a segment called “Halal Things Considered.”

Offering some solutions to this was The Daily Show’s “senior religious correspondent” Hasan Minhaj, who offered a new segment: “Minhaj’s Muslim Makeover.”

Larry Wilmore highlighted the continuing reactions to Caitlyn Jenner, plus the newest controversy over Mike Huckabee’s anti-transgender sermon — and in that spirit, Larry debuted a new political attack ad, about Mike Huckabee showering with teenage girls.

Conan O’Brien also looked at some of the negative reactions to Caitlyn Jenner — such as an online petition asking to take away her Olympic medals from back when she was living as Bruce Jenner.

Late Night Roundup: Going Easy On The TSA

Conan O’Brien spotlighted the news that the TSA failed to detect weapons in 95 percent of tests through airport security. But as a “real” TSA agent explained, just look at how easy it is to get fooled here.

Seth Meyers also commented on the news about the TSA — after all the money spent and crushing inconveniences for travelers, in order to make us think we were safer.

The Daily Show highlighted everything that has gone wrong in Iraq — and the fact that the people who got it all wrong in the first place are the ones talking about everything that President Obama is getting wrong now. Thus, Jon Stewart presents a new slogan: “Learning Curves Are For P*****s!”

Jon Stewart also looked at all the media coverage of Caitlyn Jenner — and the real social progress here: That transgender women are now so accepted, they can now be totally objectified on TV, too. “Caitlyn Jenner, congratulations — welcome to being a woman in America.”

Jimmy Kimmel highlighted Donald Trump’s upcoming big announcement — and wondered if it might be connected to another recent celebrity news story.

Jimmy Fallon also looked at the “Pros and Cons” of Donald Trump running for president:

Larry Wilmore reported on the Supreme Court’s decision this week that threw out a conviction over threatening Facebook posts — and he reacted in horror at the news of which Supreme Court Justice he’s agreeing with now.

James Corden took a shift working at a kosher butcher shop. He had a great time — if he didn’t entirely know what he was doing.

Caitlyn Jenner Comes Out

Bruce Jenner broke an Olympic world record in 1976.

Yet while that’s an accomplishment to be proud of, it doesn’t compare to how Jenner feels about the person she has become.

Caitlyn Jenner.

Caitlyn Jenner — née Bruce — was introduced to the world Monday via a Vanity Fair cover and a subsequent tweet from the woman herself:

Jenner officially came out in an interview with Diane Sawyer in April on 20/20, which was hailed as a breakthrough for transgender individuals.

The Vanity Fair story and accompanying photo shoot with iconic photographer Annie Leibovitz showcase how Bruce became Caitlyn, both physically and psychologically.

The story reveals that Jenner’s March 15 surgery for facial feminization — a process where a face is shaped to look more stereotypically feminine — was a turning point. Although he (before the Vanity Fair story, Jenner had requested that male pronouns still be used) had been dressing like a woman beforehand — in Sawyer’s interview he had noticeably longer hair — the surgery, which took 10 hours, made Bruce look more like Caitlyn.

The interview — which was seen by 20.7 million — was covered breathlessly by the media. In preparation, GLAAD put out a tip sheet for the media on how to report specifically on Jenner (they released an update after the Vanity Fair story was released).

Pronoun confusion often trips up even the most well intentioned. Even for Jenner and her interviewer, Friday Night Lights author Buzz Bissenger, it’s an issue. But Jenner — who has spent the past 65 years answering to Bruce — said it’s not something she’s hung up on.

“It’s just habit, I said, ‘Hi, Bruce here,’ and I went, Oh f**k, it ain’t Bruce, I was screwing up doing it.”

In fact, her children, according to the Vanity Fair report, have known about her feelings, some for years.

Her two oldest children, now in their mid-30s, learned from their mother, Chrystie, Jenner’s first wife, when they were teenagers.

The response to Jenner’s transition by fans, onlookers, and the media has generally been positive. (Not entirely, however.)

In an age where social issues are increasingly being brought to the forefront of discussions in American life and by activists’ demand for change, Jenner’s story has spotlighted trans issues and put a human — if not immediately recognizable — face on people who are often marginalized.

ESPN confirmed that Jenner will receive the Arthur Ashe Courage Award with all 10 of her children and stepchildren on stage.

Arthur Ashe’s story makes an apt comparison to Jenner’s. Ashe was forced to go public with the news that he had contacted HIV after USA Today effectively bullied him into responding to rampant speculation about his health. Ashe was angry about the forced disclosure. At a press conference in 1992, he objected to the infringement on his privacy: “…I didn’t commit any crime. I’m not running for public office. There was certainly no compelling medical or physical necessity to go public with my medical condition.”

That type of behavior would be derided by many news outlets today as unethical, even if USA Today purported that Ashe’s illness was a matter of great public concern. Sensitivity to individuals and what constitutes breach of confidentiality — especially in reference to identity concerns — continue to be an issue when covering newsworthy people.

Despite the timing of the announcement — June is LGBT Pride Month — Jenner dismisses criticism that she’s doing this for the publicity.

“It’s not about the fanfare, it’s not about the people cheering in the stadium, it’s not about going down the street and everybody giving you an ‘Attaboy Bruce,’ pat-on-the-back OK. This is about your life. …As soon as the Vanity Fair cover comes out, I’m free.”

Image: The best way to announce a new identity: with a fancy photo shoot by a world-renowned photographer in a glossy mag. (Vanity Fair)

‘Vanity Fair’ Debuts Caitlyn Jenner (Formerly Bruce Jenner)

Caitlyn Jenner, formerly known as Bruce Jenner, has officially debuted her identity (and new name) to the public, appearing on the cover of Vanity Fair.

The legendary Olympic athlete came out publicly as transgender in a TV special in April with Diane Sawyer of ABC News, at age 65. Since then, the subject has been further explored on the hit reality show Keeping Up with the Kardashians, in which Jenner has long appeared with various children, stepchildren, and ex-wife Kris Jenner.

The picture for the cover was taken by renowned photographer Annie Leibovitz. The magazine has posted this promo video for the article, recorded at the photo shoot:

“Bruce always had to tell a lie; he was always living that lie,” Jenner says in the video. “Every day, he always had a secret — from morning until night. Caitlyn doesn’t have any secrets. As soon as the Vanity Fair cover comes out — I’m free.”

Jenner also told the magazine: “If I was lying on my deathbed and I had kept this secret and never ever did anything about it, I would be lying there saying, ‘You just blew your entire life.’”

Caitlyn Jenner has also established a new account on Twitter, with a message reintroducing herself: